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Door County Cherry

E01.05: The Duke and I

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Yes, George III served as king from 1760 to 1820 - it is, let's just say interesting, that they are casting him as progressive on issues of race since in reality, George III opposed the abolition of slavery and, in fact, one of the charges that Jefferson initially included in the Declaration of Independence was George's support of slavery. (That section was removed before approval, which is a major plot point in the musical 1776).  I mean, I get it as an alternative history (and have no problem from it from a plot perspective but in real life, the guy was pretty problematic on a whole host of things).

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36 minutes ago, Ohiopirate02 said:

Yep.  It's George III in his decline.  

thank you.  I had a feeling it was him but obviously wasn't quite sure.  

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How did Charlotte give birth to 16 kids? Even keeping in mind that time period that seems like a lot of childbearing.

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She was born in 1744

married in 1761 (17)

according to Wikipedia 

She had 23+ years of fertility so it’s possible to have that many kids. Maybe she even had twins

 

1 hour ago, Growsonwalls said:

How did Charlotte give birth to 16 kids? Even keeping in mind that time period that seems like a lot of childbearing.

 

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1 hour ago, Growsonwalls said:

How did Charlotte give birth to 16 kids? Even keeping in mind that time period that seems like a lot of childbearing.

I kept looking. It seems she had a baby almost every year. They had 15.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/georgianera.wordpress.com/2015/05/02/the-royal-babies-of-king-george-iii-queen-charlotte/amp/

 

last kid was born 1783. Charlotte was 39. 

Edited by iwantcookies
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Yeah, that was what wet nurses were for.

It's hard to stay out until 2 and sleep until noon when you have to do feedings every three hours.

Edited by ouinason
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The wedding night was hot until he skipped all the foreplay and went straight for the main event and yet they showed her enjoying it anyway. Did a man write that scene? I mean come ON. It was her first time it takes a bit longer to get ready if you know what I mean and I think you do. 

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7 hours ago, MissL said:

The wedding night was hot until he skipped all the foreplay and went straight for the main event and yet they showed her enjoying it anyway. Did a man write that scene? I mean come ON. It was her first time it takes a bit longer to get ready if you know what I mean and I think you do. 

I went to check because you raise an interesting point. The credited writer for this episode on IMDb is Joy C. Mitchell. And in fact, there were five female writers plus Chris Van Dusen, the show creator, on the writing staff. 

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21 hours ago, MissL said:

The wedding night was hot until he skipped all the foreplay and went straight for the main event and yet they showed her enjoying it anyway. Did a man write that scene? I mean come ON. It was her first time it takes a bit longer to get ready if you know what I mean and I think you do. 

Nah, they’d been fantasizing about each other for so long, and having walks and dances and other close physical encounters, so I think they didn’t need much foreplay for their first time. Plus, it’s Romance Novel sex. 

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I literally, said "Who?" when you guys talked about Frances. Literally can't remember the child. It's a girl right? lol

I'M CALLING IT NOW: Some woman is going to show up saying her child is Simon's. They have to keep more tension since we have like 3 episodes to go? They were too keen on showing Simon turning over to um, spill his seed so he won't get Daphne pregnant. 

We agree that SIMON is a poor name for such a Gorgeous man, right? He is a Sebastian to me, no matter how over-used that name may be!

I was really confused by Daphne's anger directed toward Simon. I understand they were going for the big fight, then shagging formula. But the Tension of her being clueless + scared and his guilt about the garden + knowing she's a vulnerable virgin (vs the experienced women he's normally with) would have been more than enough to get that Bonfire started. The previous set-up was: 1-There hands were forced into a quick marriage: So he may need some time to get his bearings. However, 2- His words to Charlotte were a big Ole Clue about how he felt. If she thought he was just saying it to get the license - that scene should have come earlier. In fact, I thought they had that conversation before the wedding. I'm glad they had that conversation and clarified some things, just narrative wise it should have come sooner. Felt like someone who doesn't read or watch Romance stories who picked upon tension of the two characters clashing, while ignoring that the tension of changing, becoming someone new because of the other person is just as delicious. 

With that being said: Hot damns that scene was something else! I did have to push away my lack of love for the actress, but once I was able to do that, I was engaged. The highlight was Regé-Jean Page - he really hit the right notes (forgive the saying!). My favorite part was the undressing, he didn't ogle her body, but kept his eyes on hers. Such a nice touch.

On 1/10/2021 at 4:10 AM, Aliferously said:

I think this episode made me understand Queen Charlotte's plight a little better. I don't think she really hates him or sees him as a roadblock, she just knows that his grief/madness will never allow him to be the man she married ever again. 

I still find Daphne sort of ho hum as a main character. I also refuse to believe that someone growing up in a family with a new baby what, every other year or so would never question the mechanics of where they come from. I believe that young girls were not told everything, but not that they were not ever curious. 

And on the other end of the spectrum: I understand that Simon does not wish to have children because his own father was such a terrible example. But his best friend has three children, and surely he's the better example of how fatherhood works and that it can be an enjoyable experience. So the reticence sort of baffles me.

Poor Penelope. I think out of the bunch, I find her the most endearingly human. She just runs away with every scene she's in.

 

Good point. His whole motive is that his Father was a Cruel Bastard and his revenge was the vow to never continue his Father's name. On the positive side, it shows that when he committed to something, he is fully committed. However, we make declarations with what we know at the time. He thought this revenge would hurt his father, and therefore bring justice and joy to himself. It's time to reassess, he's only keeping the hurt his father caused him alive by stubbornly sticking to that. Time to figure out what HE really wants. 

I like you mentioned his friend because Simon may be scared he will be like his father. He does have an example of a good father and also a confident loved wife right in front of him. His mother's pain is at the root of his revenge as well. So the real issue may be that Simon is afraid of Simon being a father (and proper husband), and what kind of parent he would be. 

I too - loved the view into Charlotte's world. Humanized her but didn't take away any of her edge. It was a nice touch also because it also revealed why Simon's declaration of Friendship with Daphne worked for her. I get the sense that her and the King had that genuine love and friendship in their union.

On 1/15/2021 at 4:04 PM, MissL said:

The wedding night was hot until he skipped all the foreplay and went straight for the main event and yet they showed her enjoying it anyway. Did a man write that scene? I mean come ON. It was her first time it takes a bit longer to get ready if you know what I mean and I think you do. 

Ah! I thought the same, but then I accepted that when he had her touch herself and they were doing all the dirty talk, etc. He was getting her physically warmed-up and "prepped" for what, uh - came next. 

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19 hours ago, shoetingstar said:

He thought this revenge would hurt his father, and therefore bring justice and joy to himself. It's time to reassess, he's only keeping the hurt his father caused him alive by stubbornly sticking to that. Time to figure out what HE really wants. 

Yeah, I want to like him but his determination to keep a vow that was made for the sole purpose of demoralizing a dying man (who totally deserved it!) begins to look childish and petty now that his father is long gone and he's married to a woman who does want children.

 

19 hours ago, shoetingstar said:

His mother's pain is at the root of his revenge as well.

That's true, which is why I makes me feel he ought to have some sympathy for his wife's feelings.  

 

You know, I don't recall them ever making the point that he does not want to sire children out of fear that the pregnancy might kill the mother and leave another motherless child in the world.  If THAT is part of his motivation I might feel more sympathy for him.  But if it's just a long-simmering "fuck you" to his dead father, well then we are back to me thinking him petty and childish.

Edited by WatchrTina
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The romantic conflict between the hero and heroine is the engine that runs a romance novel.  It has to be believable and it has to be sustained up to a point otherwise you have no story.  Simon's promise to his father to let the name die with him is one of the conflicts that keep Simon and Daphne from getting to that 'Happy Ever After' that is the goal of the romance novel.  So it can't be something he can overcome too quickly.

To modern though processes it can seem petty for him to drag it on for too long.  But back then it would have been a little more complicated than that.  Simon is a gentleman.  It is more than a title, it also includes an entire code of conduct that becomes ingrained and indoctrinated.  The entire concept of 'honor' is woven into that as well.  When he promised his father it was a vow.  Simon's nature would not let him to just let that go easily.  To go back on a vow would have been an incredible  breach of honor.  So much so, he was willing to die on a dueling field in order to keep it.  So I get that it seems a rather ridiculous, but it makes sense in the context of the time.

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4 hours ago, WatchrTina said:

Yeah, I want to like him but his determination to keep a vow that was made for the sole purpose of demoralizing a dying man (who totally deserved it!) begins to look childish and petty now that his father is long gone and he's married to a woman who does want children.

 

That's true, which is why I makes me feel he ought to have some sympathy for his wife's feelings.  

 

You know, I don't recall them ever making the point that he does not want to sire children out of fear that the pregnancy might kill the mother and leave another motherless child in the world.  If THAT is part of his motivation I might feel more sympathy for him.  But if it's just a long-simmering "fuck you" to his dead father, well then we are back to me thinking him petty and childish.

Yes, he could have. I like this, it has more depth and speaks better of his character. I was thinking we would find out that he thought his earlier impediment was genetic or something and didn't want his children to suffer. The writers missed some great opportunities. When Daphne said it out loud as presented, it rang so hollow. If he had explained the WHOLE situation it would have gone down so much better. Be he stubbornly wanted to hold on to his anger. He had defined his very self with that vow.

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On 1/13/2021 at 9:15 AM, TV Diva Queen said:

Is this the same King George of Hamilton fame? (pardon my ignorance)  🙂

For a minute there I thought you were saying George Hamilton (he of the excessive tan) was a cast member here. . .

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I was really confused by Daphne's anger directed toward Simon.

I was confused too. After his speech to the Queen, I'd think they both would be okay. I had no idea why they kept avoiding each other at the wedding reception, why he was so distant when they reached the inn. (Wouldn't have worked TV-wise, but seems they could have had a conversation in the carriage. It appeared to take all day.) They steamily kissed in the garden, so obviously they wanted each other. Having to marry should have been a "yay!"

Regarding going "straight to sex," I assumed there was more foreplay between their kissing/undressing, and going to the bed. Kind of a "yada yada yada," and now we're in bed.

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On 1/16/2021 at 3:48 PM, shoetingstar said:

I was really confused by Daphne's anger directed toward Simon.

She wasn’t angry, she was frustrated. She hadn’t had a proper conversation with him. She didn’t know if what he told the Queen was true or just another part of the ruse to get the license. She didn’t know if he hated her for forcing him into marriage. She thought they’d get to clear the air on their wedding night and he puts them in separate rooms!

 

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They steamily kissed in the garden, so obviously they wanted each other. Having to marry should have been a "yay!"

Daphne probably thought that for like 2 seconds before Simon made it painfully clear that just because he liked kissing her didn’t mean he wanted to marry her.

15 minutes ago, smartymarty said:

After his speech to the Queen, I'd think they both would be okay. I had no idea why they kept avoiding each other at the wedding reception, why he was so distant when they reached the inn.

They say why in their big love declarations. Simon feels sick with guilt that he’s forced her into marriage, believes she hates him and is trying to spare her the affliction of his presence. Daphne in turn feels sick with guilt that she’s forced him into marriage, believes he hates her... you get the idea. 😄 Miscommunication between the lovers is a feature of the genre, not a bug.

Edited by Katsullivan
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1 hour ago, smartymarty said:

Regarding going "straight to sex," I assumed there was more foreplay between their kissing/undressing, and going to the bed. Kind of a "yada yada yada," and now we're in bed.

This comes down to directing and editing. And they failed here. 

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My problem isn't the going straight to sex as much as the sex lasts about a minute. We don't need to see them going at it for ages and ages, but at least they could do the old "pan away and pan back" thing.

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9 hours ago, janie jones said:

My problem isn't the going straight to sex as much as the sex lasts about a minute. We don't need to see them going at it for ages and ages, but at least they could do the old "pan away and pan back" thing.

My issue with the SImon/Daphne sex is the pull out is so dramatic. Simon always yelps as if he;s in blue-balled pain as he dramatically jumps off Daphne. A gentlemen rake would have had lots of experience pulling out and it should not always be this huge dramatic yelp. It's no wonder Daphne thought Simon genuinely had a physical ailment.

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Yes!  Though you can see why Daphne thinks that the sex is physically harming him with the dramatic flailing.

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On 1/19/2021 at 7:13 PM, janie jones said:

I just feel bad for whoever has to clean up after him.

I have learned that there formerly was "the mug method" to get pregnant. Could Daphne have used the cloth he used to wipe up?

Then Simon would either believed that despite his efforts he had failed - or doubted that he wasn't the father of the baby. 

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1 hour ago, Roseanna said:

I have learned that there formerly was "the mug method" to get pregnant. Could Daphne have used the cloth he used to wipe up?

Then Simon would either believed that despite his efforts he had failed - or doubted that he wasn't the father of the baby. 

I immediately went there in my mind, but then figured Daphne wouldn't have enough birds and bees knowledge to do that. 
But I guess she did. 
Hmmm. Now I'm rethinking her actions, but, seriously, I have thought way too much about this already.

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On 12/31/2020 at 7:31 AM, Bill1978 said:

I can tell you that this man is very appreciative that this show is more concerned with the female gaze. Especially with this episode.

I was discussing this with a friend and her response was 'There was a missing sister?' I think there are some people who may be shocked when a 4th sister appears again.

I so hope he gets his groove on with Granville, the male though. Wishful thinking I know.

I watched The Madness of King George the other night, because of this show. And I found it interesting that when George in this show started to relapse, the courtiers started to try and hold him in his chair which was very similar to the technique used by the physician in the movie to cure and control George's outburst. Not sure if the method was factual or not but it was a nice touch.

I hope Pen and Eloise can mend their friendship. And I hope Colin wakes up to the entrapment. I understand why Marina is doing what she is, but can't she do it to some other nice guy? Anyone but Colin haha.

Comedic highlight of the episode for me.

The Madness of King George is an exceptional movie.  Much of the dialogue was lifted from actual correspondence during the time.  I watched it in college and my professor was absolutely giddy about that movie. Of course I also love the “Hamilton” version of the Mad King.

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The whole 'touch yourself, show me' stuff just takes me right out of the period story because it's so preposterous that someone would say that back then on their wedding night.

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39 minutes ago, gingerella said:

The whole 'touch yourself, show me' stuff just takes me right out of the period story because it's so preposterous that someone would say that back then on their wedding night.

I'm sorry but.. what? Sex wasn't invented in the 21st century! For as long as humans have been smashing genitals together (read: forever), there've been more frisky business than a moment that was, IMO, rather vanilla dirty talk. 

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On 1/30/2021 at 1:06 PM, Katsullivan said:

I'm sorry but.. what? Sex wasn't invented in the 21st century! For as long as humans have been smashing genitals together (read: forever), there've been more frisky business than a moment that was, IMO, rather vanilla dirty talk. 

I’m not talking about the 21st century, nor whether people had frisky sex during way back when. I’m talking about a period series that takes place in Georgian England, where people did not discuss even the most basic feelings, and men certainly didn’t discuss masturbation with women. This isn’t my opinion, its history and the social norms of the time. So the dialogue is way too contemporary for the time period being depicted. That said, there are many aspects that aren’t period-correct so...

 

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5 hours ago, gingerella said:

I’m not talking about the 21st century, nor whether people had frisky sex during way back when. I’m talking about a period series that takes place in Georgian England, where people did not discuss even the most basic feelings, and men certainly didn’t discuss masturbation with women. This isn’t my opinion, its history and the social norms of the time. So the dialogue is way too contemporary for the time period being depicted. That said, there are many aspects that aren’t period-correct so...

This is simply not true.  Yes, women of Daphne's station were sheltered, but the idea that men and women didn't talk about sex or repressed their feelings or that a conversation like that could not have taken place is not true.  There is loads of scholarship out there that actually indicates that the Georgian period was a time of sexual liberation coming after the Puritan era of the 1700s.  And a lot of sex scandals amongst the nobility happened. They made the front page of papers at the time:
 

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In 1814, the politician the 4th Earl of Rosebery won the equivalent today of nearly £1m damages, in a lawsuit against his wife’s lover. Lady Rosebery’s affair with her dead sister’s husband, Sir Henry Mildmay, was described as a crime of “extraordinary atrocity”. The case was so sensational it was reported in papers nationwide and made page two of The Times.

The public was riveted by the dramatic saga and all the intimate details of the ardent love-letters read out in court, in which Sir Henry begged Harriet to leave her husband, recalling “every burning kiss” they had shared. He was so besotted, he wore her yellow garters as a keepsake because they had been “twined round, and encircled [my] dear Harriet’s limbs – bliss unspeakable!” The secret was exposed one night after dinner at the family seat of Barnbougle Castle in Scotland. Sir Henry had disguised himself as a common sailor and climbed in through the bedchamber window for a secret assignation, but the lovers were interrupted by Lord Rosebery’s brother trying to break down the locked door. The next day they eloped to the continent.

 

 

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On 1/30/2021 at 3:23 PM, gingerella said:

The whole 'touch yourself, show me' stuff just takes me right out of the period story because it's so preposterous that someone would say that back then on their wedding night.

Maybe it would have been out of character for people to talk about while having tea. But Simon and Daphne are husband and wife, and I'm sure husbands and wives discussed sexual matters privately.

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4 hours ago, DearEvette said:

This is simply not true.  Yes, women of Daphne's station were sheltered, but the idea that men and women didn't talk about sex or repressed their feelings or that a conversation like that could not have taken place is not true.  There is loads of scholarship out there that actually indicates that the Georgian period was a time of sexual liberation coming after the Puritan era of the 1700s.  And a lot of sex scandals amongst the nobility happened. They made the front page of papers at the time:

Yes, agreed. Going back to my knowledge of late 18th century America (which I know better than Regency England), you only have to read the letters between John and Abigail Adams to understand that they had a pretty healthy sex life and weren't exactly afraid to talk about it with each other.  Their letters are metaphorical in nature and not vulgar or anything (particular the ones that were written before their marriage) but I have little doubt that once they were married, they weren't afraid of actually speaking words to each other about sex, given what they were willing to put in their letters. 

Not every era prior to our own was the Victorian era and not everyone in the past was afraid of sex, etc. Obviously, Bridgerton is a fantasy meant to appeal to modern audiences, so yes, historical liberties were taken. But I am not sure I find it difficult to believe that a young couple who were hot for each other discussed their attraction to each other in the middle of having sex in the early 19th century, just like people do today. 

Edited by eleanorofaquitaine
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2 minutes ago, eleanorofaquitaine said:

Not every era prior to our own was the Victorian era and not everyone in the past was afraid of sex, etc. Obviously, Bridgerton is a fantasy meant to appeal to modern audiences, so yes, historical liberties were taken. But I am not sure I find it difficult to believe that a young couple who were hot for each other discussed their attraction to each other in the middle of having sex in the early 19th century, just like people do today.

And then, as is now and even in the more puritanical periods, there's how power influencers (church) think/talk about how people should behave and how they actually do.  The mores tamper some behavior talk but not all of it. 

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I didn't think it was out of character for Daphne to talk about touching herself. She's sheltered but not a prisspot. She;s not like Violet. I don;t have any doubts that when Daphne has "the talk" with her daughters she's not going to babble on about dogs and puppies.

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1 hour ago, Growsonwalls said:

I didn't think it was out of character for Daphne to talk about touching herself. She's sheltered but not a prisspot. She;s not like Violet. I don;t have any doubts that when Daphne has "the talk" with her daughters she's not going to babble on about dogs and puppies.

I expected a "Hey, remember when you were wondering where babies came from?" conversation between her and Eloise.

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There were lots of scandalous things that people did in the georgian and regency eras.  Those highwaisted dresses they wore were often made of fabric so thin it was basically transparent and wetting down your skirts so that your legs could be seen (gasp) was a thing.  They were still British so there wasn't the sexual liberation that was seen in France but the Victorian era was a step backwards in liberation from earlier times (the pox didn't help).

Besides, this is a bodice ripper.  It's hot to think of him talking to her like that.  🙂

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Okay, I know I am in the minority here, but I am hoping I can get some help here....

 

I made it to Episode 5 of this show and for the love of God, what is the appeal????

 

This show is boring!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! So boring!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

I thought it showed promise when the Prince entered the picture and I thought that might get dragged out, but no, Daphne and the Duke are already married????

 

And the press was saying that this show had the "steamiest" and most "racy" sex scenes for Netflix! Please! these sex scenes are rated PG-13! This show is child's play compared to what is on HBO or even other shows on Netflix!

 

I just don't get how this show is their biggest success over shows like the Umbrella Academy, The Crown, Ozark, and heck, even Stranger Things!

 

The costume design and set design is beautiful, so I will give it that...like the diversity of the cast....but the story itself......MEH!

 

Can someone please explain to me the appeal? Help me see what I am missing??? I am not hard to please when it comes to TV 😅

 

 

Edited by snickers
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14 hours ago, snickers said:

Okay, I know I am in the minority here, but I am hoping I can get some help here....

 

I made it to Episode 5 of this show and for the love of God, what is the appeal????

 

This show is boring!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! So boring!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

I thought it showed promise when the Prince entered the picture and I thought that might get dragged out, but no, Daphne and the Duke are already married????

 

And the press was saying that this show had the "steamiest" and most "racy" sex scenes for Netflix! Please! these sex scenes are rated PG-13! This show is child's play compared to what is on HBO or even other shows on Netflix!

 

I just don't get how this show is their biggest success over shows like the Umbrella Academy, The Crown, Ozark, and heck, even Stranger Things!

 

The costume design and set design is beautiful, so I will give it that...like the diversity of the cast....but the story itself......MEH!

 

Can someone please explain to me the appeal? Help me see what I am missing??? I am not hard to please when it comes to TV 😅

 

 

It's romance novels produced by Shonda.

My expectations were quite low.

That said, probably due to the complicated times in which we are all living?  Having an "Austen Lite" (very lite) novel sort of hit the spot.  It's a bit like pumpkin pie and whipped cream, not something I want very often, but at Thanksgiving?  It's perfect.

Personally I think the sex scenes were, if anything, too explicit, but again, romance novel where "exploding orgasms" litter most of the pages, so again, expected.

Edited by Umbelina
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On 1/17/2021 at 5:39 PM, shoetingstar said:

was thinking we would find out that he thought his earlier impediment was genetic or something and didn't want his children to suffer. The

IIRC, in the book

Spoiler

He is concerned about passing his stutter on to his children  it isn’t the main reason he doesn’t want kids, but it’s something addressed there that isn’t really addressed in this series  

 

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I think the most shocking thing about the Georgian time period may have been hygiene habits.  I read some stuff that made my skin crawl and my scalp itch....like living things were nesting in some of those wigs women wore.  And men had shorn hair under their wigs to keep head lice at bay. They still had lice though.  And often the powder women used would make them break out something awful.  And STDS were everywhere.

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On 2/4/2021 at 2:03 PM, Umbelina said:

It's romance novels produced by Shonda.

 Yeah, i saw after i made this post that this was a book or books i've come to learn....

and i finished the show so i'll post in my thoughts  in episode 8

i think hygiene habits all around were god awful until what? the 1920's? 😄 when did the actual shower come on the market? i'm thinking around then....

I heard there is a reason there was the saying "pocket full of posy" due to the bad hygiene!!!! so glad i live in the now 😅

Edited by snickers
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17 hours ago, snickers said:

I heard there is a reason there was the saying "pocket full of posy" due to the bad hygiene!!!! so glad i live in the now 😅

That's from a children's rhyme , "ring around the rosy, pocket full of posy" - I was told that rhyme is somehow ?  referring to the Black Death aka the Plague.  Also, the root for us politely saying "Bless you" when somebody sneezes, or "Gesundheit" (which literally means "good health" in German) comes from people believing that the Plague was caused by bad spirits. One of the first symptoms could be sneezing and people started saying "bless you" to ward off the bad spirits.

Sorry for side tracking the thread with yucky history, I guess my point was that in real life many of these fancy and pretty aristocrats may not have smelled good, especially when all crowded together in an overheated ball room.  Pretty Daphne may have had body odor, lol.

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On 12/28/2020 at 11:18 AM, DearEvette said:

Speaking of the queen, her smallish scene with Mad King George was well done and gave her a little bit of inner life outside of simply being this all powerful queen character.  I liked that little bit of character texture for her.

 

On 12/31/2020 at 4:31 AM, Bill1978 said:

I watched The Madness of King George the other night, because of this show. And I found it interesting that when George in this show started to relapse, the courtiers started to try and hold him in his chair which was very similar to the technique used by the physician in the movie to cure and control George's outburst. Not sure if the method was factual or not but it was a nice touch.

I really enjoyed that scene, you could see how much she cared for him, & her heartache when he stopped being lucid, especially when he accused her of killing her own child, which she probably had enough grief about. I'm a little confused about whether they are keeping the King hidden though. When the servant first came in & started a sentence with "the King", the Queen immediately said "is dead". Did she tell everyone that he died?

The Duke is just soooo hot, during the wedding night scene when he dropped his trousers I actually said "HELLOOOOOO" out loud LOL. This also makes me wonder about the coming seasons. I think the Duke's hotness is a big reason that Bridgerton is so successful, because let's face it, this show was made for women. How are they going to get another guy that creates the buzz that Regé-Jean Page does? Plus, (and this may sound a little strange), I think that one of the reasons he's considered so hot to us now is that his hair is a modern hairstyle. I guess there wasn't anything they could do with the black guy's hair to make it period correct like all the white guys. I can only speak for myself when I say, lucky black guys because the white guys are not looking hot to me. If the lead guy next season is white, what are they going to do about his hair? I just can't see a guy with one of the bizarre hairstyles they have being considered sexy now.

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23 hours ago, magdalene said:

That's from a children's rhyme , "ring around the rosy, pocket full of posy" - I was told that rhyme is somehow ?  referring to the Black Death aka the Plague.  Also, the root for us politely saying "Bless you" when somebody sneezes, or "Gesundheit" (which literally means "good health" in German) comes from people believing that the Plague was caused by bad spirits. One of the first symptoms could be sneezing and people started saying "bless you" to ward off the bad spirits.

I think I've heard this too...but apparently it was common in the middle ages for people to wear flowers on them and in their pockets because they smelled like...you know what....

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On 2/11/2021 at 7:28 PM, GaT said:

I really enjoyed that scene, you could see how much she cared for him, & her heartache when he stopped being lucid, especially when he accused her of killing her own child, which she probably had enough grief about. I'm a little confused about whether they are keeping the King hidden though. When the servant first came in & started a sentence with "the King", the Queen immediately said "is dead". Did she tell everyone that he died?

The time period Bridgerton is set in is known as The Regency. At this time The Prince of Wales was acting as Price Regent - King in everything but name basically - while his dad was experiencing bouts of madness. The King was kept away from court when he wasn't lucid, so therefore the Queen was living apart from him and didn't know what was happening unless she was given reports. So in that scene she had jumped to the conclusion the messenger had arrived to inform her that George had succumbed to his madness. All of Britain knew the King was alive, if he was dead (or The Queen had told people he had died) then the Prince of Wales would have been King and not Regent. The Regency officially spanned the years 1811 - 1820. Informally the Regency era last from 1795 until 1837 

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9 hours ago, Bill1978 said:

The time period Bridgerton is set in is known as The Regency. At this time The Prince of Wales was acting as Price Regent - King in everything but name basically - while his dad was experiencing bouts of madness. The King was kept away from court when he wasn't lucid, so therefore the Queen was living apart from him and didn't know what was happening unless she was given reports. So in that scene she had jumped to the conclusion the messenger had arrived to inform her that George had succumbed to his madness. All of Britain knew the King was alive, if he was dead (or The Queen had told people he had died) then the Prince of Wales would have been King and not Regent. The Regency officially spanned the years 1811 - 1820. Informally the Regency era last from 1795 until 1837 

Thanks for the info. I don't think they're actually being that correct about history, or maybe they were in the books, but not the show. I can't remember (or maybe it's just me LOL) anything about the Queen's son being mentioned, the only Prince was her nephew. I would think that if there was an actual Prince Regent, he would have been at least shown at a ball, if not part of the plot. I had the impression that the Queen was the one ruling.

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Just now, GaT said:

Thanks for the info. I don't think they're actually being that correct about history, or maybe they were in the books, but not the show. I can't remember (or maybe it's just me LOL) anything about the Queen's son being mentioned, the only Prince was her nephew. I would think that if there was an actual Prince Regent, he would have been at least shown at a ball, if not part of the plot. I had the impression that the Queen was the one ruling.

The Prince Regent commonly known as Prinny is not someone you want showing up in your romance novel.  He is a figure from history who exists, but is never seen because he is the antithesis of a romance hero.  He lived lavishly indulging in drink, food and women, and all of those vices caught up to him as he aged.  In romance, rakes are never supposed to show the wear and tear, and George IV did.  He was an unfaithful husband to his daddy-approved legitimate wife Princess Charlotte, and a distant father to his only daughter also named Charlotte.  

We see Queen Charlotte here because she and George III are a love story suitable for a romance novel, and also because the show uses Charlotte as a way to explain their casting choices.  I am surprised that we did not see any of Charlotte's many daughters.  IRL, they were her constant companions during her husband's illness to the point where very few of them married.  

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Plus, the Queen was obviously bored out of her mind. These balls and gathering were the only place she had power. 

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