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COVID-19: Personal Stories

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48 minutes ago, theatremouse said:

This is totally cool with me. My current concern is speed of distribution. I am under the impression the longest known immunity is 6ish months from recovery. It's too soon to know if the vaccine helps for longer than that. There need to be more than a million people a day nationally getting it. That's my current concern. I'm in tier 1 C. This morning I found an online calculator that basically tells you your place "in line" within your county and the country. It was kind of cool but also kind of weird to see literal numbers because if I do the math on how many days that should mean vs the timeline the county has said to expect, it's not good.

As for the story about rich people offering $$$ to jump the line, I read about that also but everything I saw was about clinics turning them down because the practice would face serious consequences for accepting. So I'm not worried that rich people are trying to jump the line, since it sounds like they're not succeeding.

Not to be too pessimistic or contrary, but if something isn't done about where they can allow those extra vial doses to go, I wouldn't be surprised if some of them went to rich people who either used influence or put up an attractive amount of money for them.  There are a lot of people looking for loopholes and individual doctors employed by mega rich people.

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2 hours ago, shapeshifter said:

Yes. I am concerned that there hasn’t been enough thought given to stopping the spread as there has been to stopping the deaths——because ultimately we can’t stop the death count without stopping the spread.  

I've seen the analogy of a fire hose (the vaccine) against a raging forest fire (uncontrolled spread). Vaccine won't help if we're spreading it faster than we can get people protected from it.

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CT is currently in phase 1a with plans to announce plans for 1b by the end of the month. I'll be in 1c, I think. The university hasn't said what's going on with spring semester and I'm considering whether to get an extension on my medical exemption. I could stay on medical leave until 2/18 but I want to WFH at least part-time as soon as possible.

@shapeshifter, I so envy you moving to the land of Wegman's.

Edited by ABay
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35 minutes ago, ABay said:

@shapeshifter, I so envy you moving to the land of Wegman's.

Early on I checked out Wegman's online and saw they have my bread (Ezekiel) and my Unsweetened Silk Soy Milk, so I checked "food desert?" off my mental list.

But I will be leaving behind a thoughtfully rolling out vaccine plan for the state of Illinois where you register online and get notified when its your turn, which, if I stayed, would have been around April. I guesstimate in NY state it will be around July. 

At least I can still listen to WBEZ streaming if I want to hear the Illinois governor's avuncular, professorial, guy-from-the-neighborhood-bowling-team voice during the regular Covid updates, but those updates won't really pertain to me anymore. Once he almost lost his cool, but that just proved he was human. He may be rich, but I can't really hold that against him. 
I did check out the NY governor in an interview with Colbert, and he's okay, but not so down to earth. 

I guess this is where I thank goodness I didn't move to Florida to be near mom before she died. It seems their method of distributing the vaccine is akin to camping out in line for the newest iPhone or Star Wars movie --with this behavior encouraged by the authorities,  and with masks optional. 

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Just found out that the retirement residence where my mother lives is now in lockdown because one of the nurses tested positive for Covid.  Sigh.  They've been really awesome there about following the rules so I am hopeful that this won't spread but my niece, who is also a nurse there, just informed us that they are in the process of swabbing all the residents as a precaution.  The most worrying thing is my Mom's surgery is scheduled for mid January.  Even if she doesn't get Covid, if the residence is in lockdown I suspect, strongly, that they will postpone the surgery.  Dammit 2020 you couldn't leave things be could you?

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13 hours ago, shapeshifter said:

That sounds to me like it was the result of the vials containing more doses than was noted (as was widely reported when the first vaccines arrived). I imagine using them before they lost viability was a key factor in determining who got the extra doses, and that proximity to the vials was the other determining factor. Still, I wonder if just a tiny bit more effort might have resulted in, for example, the extra doses going to custodians who cleaned the clinic.

It's not a clinic--it's a big healthcare organization.  And he said they had "a lot" of extra after vaccinating the clinical staff, so it wasn't just the extra dose in a given vial.  And he wasn't in any proximity to any vial--he works from home.

In my area, a hospital that had "leftover" vaccine, like in the bottom of a vial or fixing to expire because it had been defrosted (I can't remember), gave it to police who were around (and weren't currently eligible for it, but were in the next phase). 

I don't begrudge my healthy young friend getting the vaccine at all; I'm patiently waiting my place last in line.  But I'm big on rules, and they're quite clear on their face, and the reasoning behind them is clear, as well.  A the same time, I understand extenuating circumstances, and obviously don't want any vaccine to go to waste, so I'm okay with someone holding a syringe with one dose left and no more appointments scheduled and looking around and seeing a cop and saying, "Hey, wanna get vaccinated"?  But that's not what happened to my friend.

 

9 hours ago, Jane Tuesday said:

Frankly, I'm less concerned with who is getting it than I am that someone is. Vaccines aren't really about protecting individuals. They're about stopping spread, which then protects us all.

At this point, it's actually the opposite.  The only thing we actually know about this vaccine is that it protects individuals, by reducing the severity of illness resulting from infection. 

It is unknown whether it stops transmission--they didn't have enough time to test that, and they were just trying to find out if it worked at reducing the effects of being infected, and when it was shown to be safe and effective for that purpose, it was approved.  And think about this--it's possible that the vaccine could reduce symptoms enough to make someone asymptomatic but still be shedding virus, which is the nightmare scenario we're already dealing with. 

It's highly improbable that it won't have any effect at all on transmission, but we just don't know.  And we definitely don't know how much it will affect transmission.  This is going to be another messaging issue, because people are going to assume it makes them not contagious, when all we know is that it makes you not as sick if you get it.  So you'll have the ones who already don't care about the spread, and we'll be adding all the ones who (reasonably) believe that being vaccinated means they won't be transmitting it. 

Actually, I'm kind of glad we don't know if it affects transmission because it means that even after vaccinations really get going, there's going to be no excuse for people not to be wearing a mask--the same as it is now.  The non-maskers won't be able to prance around with the benefit of others withholding the stink-eye on the belief that they've been vaccinated.  Plus I doubt that non-maskers will be lining up for a microchip-implanting vaccine in the first place, so the odds that they actually are vaccinated are low.  I'm glad they won't have the cover of a presumed vaccination making their behavior acceptable.  At least it's a small silver lining in the cloud of uncertainty about vaccines and transmission.

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46 minutes ago, StatisticalOutlier said:

I don't begrudge my healthy young friend getting the vaccine at all; I'm patiently waiting my place last in line.  But I'm big on rules, and they're quite clear on their face, and the reasoning behind them is clear, as well.  A the same time, I understand extenuating circumstances, and obviously don't want any vaccine to go to waste, so I'm okay with someone holding a syringe with one dose left and no more appointments scheduled and looking around and seeing a cop and saying, "Hey, wanna get vaccinated"?  But that's not what happened to my friend.

We're on the same page here; I'm just not always good at explaining my position. Verbosity does not equal clarity. 😉 

However, I had not carefully considered this, and am readjusting my mindset accordingly:

48 minutes ago, StatisticalOutlier said:

The only thing we actually know about this vaccine is that it protects individuals, by reducing the severity of illness resulting from infection. 

It is unknown whether it stops transmission-

 

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1 hour ago, StatisticalOutlier said:

It's highly improbable that it won't have any effect at all on transmission, but we just don't know.  And we definitely don't know how much it will affect transmission.  This is going to be another messaging issue, because people are going to assume it makes them not contagious, when all we know is that it makes you not as sick if you get it.  So you'll have the ones who already don't care about the spread, and we'll be adding all the ones who (reasonably) believe that being vaccinated means they won't be transmitting it. 

Interesting! Thank you for clarifying. I feel like my local health departments are all positioning the vaccine as "stopping the spread". (To be fair, they've been clear that masking should still be done.)

But... I still maintain that it's better for everyone - not just the person vaccinated - when anyone gets the vaccine. Because the crisis we're facing right now - at least where I am - is a lack of hospital beds for everyone, not just covid patients. My regional hospital is at 100% capacity on all beds, including 100% of ICU beds, for the first time since this started. They're doing no non-critical surgeries, and they've built more negative-pressure rooms, but they can't hire enough nurses to staff them. Anything that relieves that pressure is a positive. 

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Just saw that California has confirmed that they've come across a couple cases of the UK variant of the virus that is more transmissible.

Hopefully the tests they are doing on the vaccines to see how it works on this strain go well.

 

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9 hours ago, ParadoxLost said:

Just saw that California has confirmed that they've come across a couple cases of the UK variant of the virus that is more transmissible.

Hopefully the tests they are doing on the vaccines to see how it works on this strain go well.

 

All of my family is in Ca that news does not make me happy. DS has had the Moderna vaccine, DD is a police officer assume she has had a vaccination though she hasn't said which one when... When will this nightmare be over????

Edited by Gramto6
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I am going to personally assume that the new, more contagious variant will soon be everywhere——both because that seems scientifically logical to me, and because it’s like always wearing a seatbelt because an accident could be anywhere. 
And, anyway, the only recommendations regarding the variant seem to be to be vigilant about masking, social distancing, and hand washing. 
But as someone who has been obsessively  curious about how things work for my entire life, I would really like more information about what makes this variant “more contagious.”
I mean: Does it live longer on surfaces? Does it linger longer in the air? Is it resistant to alcohol? Is it a temperature range issue? Or could they be somewhat mistaken about it being a new variant and it’s just that the virus always survived longer in cooler temperatures?

Sorry. My mom always encouraged such musings as if my genius mind was going to find the cure for, well, the plague or something. Mom preferred to see me as just the A student rather than the A student with a problem of ruminating. Even as an adult she took my ideas seriously. 
Fortunately, Dad, OTOH, just wanted to be sure, for example, that my being a fan of a show about extraterrestrials didn’t mean I believed they had landed in Roswell. So I’m not inclined to bark up the nearest conspiracy tree, thank goodness. 
But especially as the date of my move out of state approaches, I do wish the scientists would give us more specific information about how it is “up to 50% more contagious.” Does that mean my son-in-law should drive 10+ hours here to get me and then we drive 10+ hours there rather than my flying in my front row seat with no other seat next to mine in order to avoid traipsing through O’Hare airport?

The only thing that seems certain is that the best verbal invective I can now hurl at some idiot on the road——whether it be a driver, walker, cyclist, runner, or dog-walker——is:
You Variant!!!
Or maybe, to be a bit more clear:
You Virulent Variant!!!

Edited by shapeshifter
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1 hour ago, shapeshifter said:

But as someone who has been obsessively  curious about how things work for my entire life, I would really like more information about what makes this variant “more contagious.”
I mean: Does it live longer on surfaces? Does it linger longer in the air? Is it resistant to alcohol? Is it a temperature range issue? Or could they be somewhat mistaken about it being a new variant and it’s just that the virus always survived longer in cooler temperatures?

They don't know yet. They are testing.  The reason they think its more transmissible is because of how fast it took over being the dominant strain in Britain so they think its "advantaged" for transmission in some way.  In some of the articles I read it sounds like some of the mutations may make the spike proteins stickier for human cells. 

1 hour ago, shapeshifter said:

Fortunately, Dad, OTOH, just wanted to be sure, for example, that my being a fan of a show about extraterrestrials didn’t mean I believed they had landed in Roswell. So I’m not inclined to bark up the nearest conspiracy tree, thank goodness. 

It was a shit ton more fun to watch Roswell and X Files with there being an outside chance of maybe aliens do exist.  Grandpa ruined that with facts and names of what happened at Roswell.  He was a test pilot at a nearby base when it went down.  He treated that stuff as military secrets until very late in his life so at least I got to enjoy the possibilities of those shows on their initial airings.

However, it does cause me to bark up conspiracy trees, just of a different variety.  Because seriously.  The cover up.  It was for stupid, extremely stupid, reasons.  I don't even know if its a cover up really.  Just "no comment" in the face of alien hysteria building into a tourism and entertainment industry to avoid embarrassment.  Even the conspiracy theories, on what it was instead of being aliens, is way more interesting than what Grandpa told us. I sometimes wonder if what Grandpa said was just another story someone fed him to cover something up.  I've googled it and I can't find anything like it as a theory anywhere so if it was disinformation, it didn't spread. I don't want to believe Grandpa, because its a buzzkill. 

Taking that back to covid.  Above types of things have influenced how I was raised and how I perceive authority figures.

I basically look at all the people who are crafting the messaging for covid and default to looking for the attempt to manipulate the public. I don't trust that there isn't an ulterior motive.  I look for the manipulation and at lots of sources for information.

For example, the way they handled the messaging around masks annoyed the crap out of me.  I don't think the authorities and media were innocently wrong about masks working and then corrected themselves.  I think they were trying to manipulate a result.  Divert limited supplies to medical personnel.  Don't trust the individual.  Don't even bother to try to reason with them.  Would have honesty and a plea worked out better?  Eh. I'm on the fence.  But what they did shot their credibility and gave the aliens have been here types fertile ground for the Covid is a lie, masks don't work, etc. conspiracy theories.

Now I'm watching them slow walk the messaging about the vaccine and the mutations. Really seems to me like they are trying to incrementally move everyone to a place where they understand that this is like the flu.  Not in severity, but that there is no "cure", its going to be an every year you get a covid shot and you hope that they predicted which strains were going to be dominant to limit the cases.

Edited by ParadoxLost
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I got an email from my mother's retirement community just now informing me that as I am considered an "essential caregiver" I qualify to get the vaccine now.  Totally mixed feelings on this.  I absolutely do not want to jump the queue and get this vaccine before others who IMO should be getting it sooner (teachers come to mind) but of course it would give me peace of mind to have this vaccine - not that it solves everything but it would be a help.  

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6 minutes ago, WinnieWinkle said:

Totally mixed feelings on this.  I absolutely do not want to jump the queue and get this vaccine before others who IMO should be getting it sooner (teachers come to mind) but of course it would give me peace of mind to have this vaccine - not that it solves everything but it would be a help. 

I understand and appreciate the sentiment, but if you give up your place in line now, it's not like they're going to go hand your dose to a teacher or anyone else you think should be eligible now but isn't, so go ahead and protect yourself, your mom, and others to the best of your ability given this opportunity.  You're not being unfair to anyone, you're existing within a system that has to draw somewhat arbitrary lines that will probably shift over time; on the whole, everyone is just doing the best they can, and ultimately every vaccination is a good thing.

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Stopped at Wegmans on my way home from work (half day so it was around 2pm)...it was so busy and I'm kinda regretting it and I will probably freak out for the next few days. Everyone was masked and I got out as quickly as I could but so. many. people! (Also what is it with people in crowded parking lots apparently forgetting that turn signals are a thing that exist?)

But now at least I won't have to go out again until Monday (to work). Normally for New Year's Eve I would go to my friend's and we would just hang out with her husband and kids and have dinner and watch the Twilight Zone (well, we did before she had kids; now it's more likely Disney) and exchange Christmas presents. I dropped their gifts (gave them gift cards) in the mailbox at the grocery store and will hang at home. I have no booze but I do have ginger beer and mozzarella sticks.

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2 hours ago, WinnieWinkle said:

I got an email from my mother's retirement community just now informing me that as I am considered an "essential caregiver" I qualify to get the vaccine now.  Totally mixed feelings on this.  I absolutely do not want to jump the queue and get this vaccine before others who IMO should be getting it sooner (teachers come to mind) but of course it would give me peace of mind to have this vaccine - not that it solves everything but it would be a help.  

Take it!  You didn’t go looking to “jump the queue” and as Bastet said you turning it down doesn’t mean they will give it to someone you think should get it earlier.

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23 hours ago, ParadoxLost said:

Just saw that California has confirmed that they've come across a couple cases of the UK variant of the virus that is more transmissible.

Hopefully the tests they are doing on the vaccines to see how it works on this strain go well.

 

 

13 hours ago, Gramto6 said:

All of my family is in Ca that news does not make me happy. DS has had the Moderna vaccine, DD is a police officer assume she has had a vaccination though she hasn't said which one when... When will this nightmare be over????

This will make you even more unhappy, 40%-50% of LA's Front-Line Workers Declined the COVID Vaccine , this is probably how people not at the front of the queue are getting the vaccine, the people at the front are refusing it.

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16 minutes ago, Caoimhe said:
3 hours ago, WinnieWinkle said:

I got an email from my mother's retirement community just now informing me that as I am considered an "essential caregiver" I qualify to get the vaccine now.  Totally mixed feelings on this.  I absolutely do not want to jump the queue and get this vaccine before others who IMO should be getting it sooner (teachers come to mind) but of course it would give me peace of mind to have this vaccine - not that it solves everything but it would be a help.  

Take it!  You didn’t go looking to “jump the queue” and as Bastet said you turning it down doesn’t mean they will give it to someone you think should get it earlier.

Plus, it sounds like getting the vaccine could become a requirement later for you to continue uninterrupted visits there. 
The loneliness among the elderly is a real problem related to the pandemic. 

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3 hours ago, WinnieWinkle said:

I got an email from my mother's retirement community just now informing me that as I am considered an "essential caregiver" I qualify to get the vaccine now.  Totally mixed feelings on this.  I absolutely do not want to jump the queue and get this vaccine before others who IMO should be getting it sooner (teachers come to mind) but of course it would give me peace of mind to have this vaccine - not that it solves everything but it would be a help.  

Agree with everyone else - get the vaccine. It not only protects you but it will also protect the residents and caregivers at your mother’s retirement community. 

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1 minute ago, MargeGunderson said:

Agree with everyone else - get the vaccine. It not only protects you but it will also protect the residents and caregivers at your mother’s retirement community. 

Even though there is still a question about whether those who are vaccinated can still become silent carriers/spreaders (so you should still wear a mask), at least you will not be taking up space in a Covid hospital unit. 

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Yeah.  Get the vaccine.  If you're not doing anything underhanded to get it, and it's being offered, take it.  I recently read an article that was taking the vaccine rollout to task because there has been such a preciousness about the distribution when it might be better to just start vaccinating as many people as possible.  It's why some countries are not holding back second doses.  They're just giving out everything they have and will give a second dose later than the three or four weeks. 

That's not to say that it shouldn't be offered to health care workers first...etc.  but no one wins if everyone says 'you go first/no, YOU go first.'  All you have is an impasse, unused vaccines and fewer people vaccinated.

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I have to wonder - the people ( or people who know people) who got the vaccine because they were in the right place at the right time (like, there were extra doses that would otherwise go to waste) - is there a system in place to make sure they can get the second dose at the appropriate time?  

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3 hours ago, GaT said:

 

This will make you even more unhappy, 40%-50% of LA's Front-Line Workers Declined the COVID Vaccine , this is probably how people not at the front of the queue are getting the vaccine, the people at the front are refusing it.

My family is in the SF Bay Area with 2 GD's in college but doing classes online from home. I worry about all of them and miss them so much as I missed my yearly visits this year.

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Reporting back (74 and 73 parents- both positive for new readers) are doing well!  My dad dealt with a pretty high fever over a week and my mom has head cold type stuff but overall things are ok. Whew!  

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I have been researching the vaccine as much as I can myself, so as to be well informed when it comes time for mainly my husband to receive it.  He is an at-risk person with several complicating factors.  This is an item I came across, and thought it might prove helpful going forward.  

adverse-events-reported-after-covid-19-vaccine-so-far

The article links to the VAERS (Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System) site, and also shares anecdotal information from those having received the vaccine.

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Wednesday morning I get a call from my aunt asking if I can take her 84 year old friend to the ER.  He has been getting these massive nose bleeds (like seriously gushing blood with nor warning). I let work know I have to be offline and rush to his house.  Hair still wet from my shower.  He is not ready to go.  🤯 So I wait and have to talk him out of many of the bazillion things he wants to do first.  Meanwhile, he is still gushing blood from his nose; it's all over his shirt and pants, on the floor, on walls where he's placed his hand.  He is so lucky I am good with these kinds of things.  My sister would have passed out by now.

He ends up calling his doctor who asks him come to his office.  I at least convince my aunt's friend that he cannot take a shower in his current condition.  He does change his clothes.  He then wants to stop at CVS on the way to the doctor, because, y'know, no one will have an issue with his exposed nose fountain while he does some shopping.  😳 🙄 🤯

I get him to the nicest doctor in the world (the office was supposed to be closed for the week) and they do a procedure to stop the bleeding.  They also shove what looks like an enormous tampon up his nose.  It ends up this has been happening for weeks now.  This is the third time he is having this procedure.  He also had things he was supposed to do that he has not necessarily been doing.  😬

He then insists I take him to my aunt's house.  She then decides she'll stay with him overnight at his house so she can watch him.  We then go to CVS.  Finally I drop them off at his house.  The doctor checks on him Wednesday afternoon and evening and again Thursday morning.

Thursday morning I call to check on him and don't get any answer.  Seems they decided to do errands, thereby doing the opposite of what the doctor requested - stay propped up in bed or in a chair, no major activity, don't drive until we know you're stabilized, take at least a sip of water every five minutes, . . . .  About an hour later my aunt calls in a panic.  His nosebleed is back.  At least 1 cup of blood lost within minutes.  They called the doctor and he will be meeting them at the ER.  They are taking a cab because an ambulance would make too much sense? (Note, my aunt's friend has a solid pension and can afford to pay for an ambulance so it is not a financial decision).  He changes clothes because reasons. Instead of using his chair lift to get down the stairs, he insists on walking and falls.  He then claims he can't hurt that knee because it's been replaced.  Meanwhile, knee is swelling so bad that you can see it through his baggy pants. They finally get him to the ER and my aunt is not allowed to go in with him.  He is also somewhat disoriented from the fall and blood loss. 

My aunt comes to my house with her tiny dog who she brought long for all of this.  (Of course, Tiny Dog is the best so he does make all things better 🙂 ). And we wait for the call.  Finally hear that they will be keeping him in the hospital for a few days while they figure out why this keeps happening.  So we all feel better that he is being looked after and cannot keep doing the opposite of what he is told.  At the same time, this is no time to be in a hospital if you can avoid it.  

And on the selfish note, I spend the evening taking my aunt back to his house to collect her things, then ordering and picking up dinner, then staying with her for awhile to finally head home and rush to the store because I really wanted to take advantage of some great sales only to see empty shelves because everyone else clearly wanted to take advantage of those sales and stocked the freezer while they could.  (We're talking meat and poultry at 10-25% of normal prices.)  Got home.  Decided I was still having the champagne and caviar I planned on.  Settle in for some TV watching.  Write to some friends.  Do some happy 2021 posts on Primetimer.  Go to bed.  Suddenly there is a ruckus out front.  The police chased someone who decided to try to hide in my driveway.  My bedroom is above the garage.  Aaarrgh!  I don't get to sleep until 3:30 AM because even though they are trying to be as quiet as possible, there is still too damn much happening out there and the supervisor shows up and shines the spotlight right into my bedroom windows.  

Okay, 2021, you have one job.  Be better than 2020.  Let's have a do over on the start of the year.  I will be considering tonight my official start of 2021.  

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1 hour ago, PrincessPurrsALot said:

Okay, 2021, you have one job.  Be better than 2020.  Let's have a do over on the start of the year.  I will be considering tonight my official start of 2021. 

Oh man, what a nightmare this all was for you.. . hoping things improve soon.  

Does your aunt's friend have family?  It sounds like he needs a more formal care plan, and that he should probably not be home alone anymore, sadly.   We had to make that decision with my mom and as difficult as that was, it was definitely for the best.  

On 12/21/2020 at 11:19 PM, Callietwo said:

The results are back and it was negative! 

She says she's feeling fine so probably just the standard sniffles.   So that makes two positive cases with our kids and one probable positive with a son in law, and three covid scares with our kids/kid in laws.    

Well, my daughter's test was a false negative.  She has Covid, as does her husband now. 

She's had mild symptoms and her husband is feeling worse. (He was feeling shitty so decided to get tested just in case even though hers was negative, which is good.)

Her work and his now will be shutting down for extensive sanitation, and the contact tracing is a nightmare.  

Her brother stopped at her house christmas eve to deliver & also pick up some gifts for him to drop off to family, including us.. he was at their house for about an hour.. distant but not masked.   And so on and so on.    It's been 7 days since he did that drop off/pick up and no symptoms so hopefully he's fine but he'll be getting a test in the morning.   As will a whole bunch of us, it seems.  😞 

 

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Oh @Callietwo, what a way to start off the year! I hope your daughter and her husband only have mild cases, and that the rest of your family is spared. 

Edited by MargeGunderson
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My question is will the current vaccinations cover the new mutation? It seems to be spreading all over very fast. Do we need a new series of vaccinations??

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Just now, Gramto6 said:

My question is will the current vaccinations cover the new mutation? It seems to be spreading all over very fast. Do we need a new series of vaccinations??

They're saying yes, the vaccine will still work against the new variant.

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3 hours ago, ams1001 said:

They're saying yes, the vaccine will still work against the new variant.

Vaccines are a weaker variant of the virus anyway. SO they build up immunity to variants of the virus because they're not meant to just cover one strain.

https://apnews.com/article/us-news-anthony-fauci-infectious-diseases-coronavirus-pandemic-6839fde8261b404ef995c682017b5a84

Anyway covid fatigue is real. My parents are in their 70s, very healthy, and they wear masks and social distance. My dad however LOVES playing blackjack and has been whining that he hasn't been to a casino in the longest. I remind him that it hasn't been "the longest" -- just since the third wave hit which was maybe 2 months ago. But like a lot of elderly people they're creatures of habit and their "habit" was to go to the casinos and play for a weekend on occasion and he's in the foulest mood because he can't do that. Ugh. I keep telling him that the vaccine is coming, that when he gets his two shots he can go to his heart's content. But the vaccine rollout is so slow and he's cranky again 😞 

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Please site your source...I'm already afraid due to a bad anaphylaxis relation to another med. 

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I personally feel safer every time I hear about someone getting vaccinated. Hopefully it helps with the spread, and as others posted above, the vaccines definitely help slow down the hospital units all becoming full. God forbid anyone in my family gets covid, I want to make sure there's hospital space. The more folks we know who get vaccinated and have had no problems, the more confidently the rest of us will get vaccinated too. 

I don't understand those who are of a particular age and have underlying health conditions being so opposed to vaccines. There are too many people who seem to think the vaccine will take them out before covid, are super concerned about long term effects as though they'll definitely live to 110 years old if they can hide long enough to avoid the virus. I haven't done a ton of research on vaccines, so pardon me if I'm saying anything really ignorant. But even though I'm one of the people who is a-okay waiting a little bit longer to get vaccinated, it concerns me that people in my life who truly need it are so adamantly against it. 

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2 hours ago, RealHousewife said:

I don't understand those who are of a particular age and have underlying health conditions being so opposed to vaccines.

Same.  Particularly since those of a certain age lived through so many other terrible diseases (polio, measles, whooping cough, etc.) that were significantly reduced or even eliminated altogether (smallpox) by vaccines.  I would think those of a certain age would be more pro-vaccine.  

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11 hours ago, Growsonwalls said:

Vaccines are a weaker variant of the virus anyway.

This is true of some vaccines, but this is not the only method of making a vaccine. The two approved in the US right now do not contain weakened virus or any virus at all. They're mRNA vaccines. See here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines/mrna.html

That said, the scientists behind the mRNA vaccines do believe it should work against the variant people are worried about right now, due to the nature of how it works. (My sister works on genomic vaccines in general, although for a much much smaller company than the those in the news.)

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4 hours ago, theatremouse said:

This is true of some vaccines, but this is not the only method of making a vaccine. The two approved in the US right now do not contained weakened virus or any virus at all. They're mRNA vaccines. See here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines/mrna.html

That said, the scientists behind the mRNA vaccines do believe it should work against the variant people are worried about right now, due to the nature of how it works. (My sister works on genomic vaccines in general, although for a much much smaller company than the those in the news.)

Yes. This distinction between the mRNA Covid vaccines and older model vaccines probably should be emphasized so people don't go barking up the wrong vaccine tree for information.*

Just as horrible wars brought us good new technology, this pandemic will advance the knowledge of the new mRNA vaccines by light years (metaphorically speaking). 
I had acne until I was completely through menopause, and I often wished they would take a sample of the contents of one of my zits, grow it in a petri dish (I wished I'd done it in Microbiology 101, LOL), and make an antibiotic that would really work for me. (Conversely, I am also weirdly "immune" to strep throat.)
I realize that antibiotics for bacteria and mRNA vaccines for viruses are not the same type of things, but my thoughts about process were not so very different.

I have to admit I'm not entirely secure with the vaccines either, but I will get them when they let me.
I am old enough to have known people who had Polio and were permanently disabled.
And I definitely got the Shingrix vaccines for Shingles --having had Chicken Pox decades before that vaccine was available. (I get flu vaccines too, having worked with College students.)
I also survived having measles and mumps and German measles (Rubella). My kids got the vaccines.
However, my oldest 2 daughters had bad reactions (high fevers, persistent screaming) to the earlier formulated Pertussis vaccines, so I understand the hesitation. 

________________
Plus, upthread there is a link which now has several yellow "Useful" icons that is from a highly dubious source; FaceBook and other social media are full of click bait like that. No wonder people are freaked out about vaccines, and then share that stuff. I can't blame them.

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Ugh...I’m still so annoyed by the unfairness/disorganization of our Covid vaccine rollout. ESPECIALLY when I heard about that pharmacist arrested in Wisconsin who willfully destroyed over 500 doses or so! Who’s to say such an insane thing won’t happen again thanks to some whackadoodle suddenly wielding so much power?!


Several teachers I worked with who now teach in smaller state counties got the vaccine last week. Meanwhile, those of us teaching in the larger metro areas have to wait for all those little counties to give out their doses. I’d GLADLY drive numerous counties away to get it if I were allowed to do so...it just feels so damned unfair.
Frontline workers like me should be allowed to go anywhere in the state to get necessary doses if we’re willing to wait in line to do so. I feel like time is running out and we’re going to get more psychos like that Wisconsin monster succeeding in wasting and/or destroying perfectly good vaccine doses the longer we wait to distribute it all. I’d gladly jump in the car and drive/wait 4-8 hours to get that vaccine like yesterday!!

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9 hours ago, RealHousewife said:

I personally feel safer every time I hear about someone getting vaccinated. Hopefully it helps with the spread, and as others posted above, the vaccines definitely help slow down the hospital units all becoming full. God forbid anyone in my family gets covid, I want to make sure there's hospital space. The more folks we know who get vaccinated and have had no problems, the more confidently the rest of us will get vaccinated too. 

I don't understand those who are of a particular age and have underlying health conditions being so opposed to vaccines. There are too many people who seem to think the vaccine will take them out before covid, are super concerned about long term effects as though they'll definitely live to 110 years old if they can hide long enough to avoid the virus. I haven't done a ton of research on vaccines, so pardon me if I'm saying anything really ignorant. But even though I'm one of the people who is a-okay waiting a little bit longer to get vaccinated, it concerns me that people in my life who truly need it are so adamantly against it. 

In my city they raised it to 75+ and the line to get one became so long they had to turn others away. I’m in the Southern US. I don’t think the people you describe are the norm. 

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Heading back into full quarantine again starting today because I need to be the caretaker for someone a little over a couple weeks from now when they have surgery.

As expected,  now that I'm going into full lockdown I'm starting to notice stuff that I should have taken care of and haven't.  Not anything that can't wait, really.  Just feels like it.  Its like being content to be at home until I schedule an appointment that says I have to be home for a certain window at which point my brain starts telling me I need to leave the house.

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6 hours ago, KnoxForPres said:

In my city they raised it to 75+ and the line to get one became so long they had to turn others away. I’m in the Southern US. I don’t think the people you describe are the norm. 

My boyfriend's parents are in their early 80s and "aren't sure" if they are going to get the vaccine. I'm baffled by this. They're pretty active and have been good about observing safety protocols—certainly much, much better than my slightly younger parents—but I just don't understand their thought process. I'm happy to wait a while to get the vaccine in favor of others at higher risk getting theirs because I hardly ever leave home and other than being overweight (coughobesethankstoeatingmypandemicfeelingscough), I'm fairly healthy and low risk. But I will still be getting it when it's my turn. I get a flu shot every year.

I think people hear the loudest voices (read: celebrities, "news" sources) that say that there is "poison" in vaccines/there are "dirty" vaccines/the carrier fluids(?) cause disease (which has never actually been proven as far as I know) or are a vehicle for microchips or whatever and don't understand the science. I barely understand it, but I fully grasp that healthy/relatively healthy people getting vaccinated helps protect those who cannot be vaccinated because of compromised immunity/health. I don't think that vital point is communicated enough by the scientific community, but even so, some people won't wear masks for 30 minutes at the supermarket to protect themselves and others, so here we are.

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15 minutes ago, bilgistic said:

My boyfriend's parents are in their early 80s and "aren't sure" if they are going to get the vaccine. I'm baffled by this. They're pretty active and have been good about observing safety protocols

Is it possible that your boyfriend's elderly parents are worried about waiting in line with unmasked people for the vaccines? (I heard an interview with an older woman in Florida who left the line for that reason.)

Or maybe they figure they've lived long lives and don't want to "use up" vaccines that could go to teachers or other not-quite-front-line people? 

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My dad is president of the reunion association for one of the ships he was on in the Navy, and runs the website. I proofread their newsletter for him, and the current one is all about their upcoming reunion in WI this summer (last year's was cancelled, for obvious reasons, and this year's planning has gone ahead with the understanding that it could get cancelled as well). A few days ago he sent me and my brother a link to test a form he made on the website. The questions included whether they were planning to come, and if yes, if they would be flying or driving and how many people would be in their party, and if they would get the covid vaccine if they were able to. These are all older people; the ship was decommissioned in the early/mid 70s, IIRC, so the youngest possible shipmates would be in their mid-60s at this point (if my math is right, someone who was 18 in the last year the ship was in service would be about 65 now). I wonder how many will say yes to the vaccine.

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8 hours ago, shapeshifter said:

Is it possible that your boyfriend's elderly parents are worried about waiting in line with unmasked people for the vaccines? (I heard an interview with an older woman in Florida who left the line for that reason.)

Or maybe they figure they've lived long lives and don't want to "use up" vaccines that could go to teachers or other not-quite-front-line people? 

I know what "news" source they follow on a daily basis, and I just looked at its website. Buried miles down the page in the "Health" section—as opposed to in the main news section at the top of the page—was the first mention of the vaccine, as a featured (accompanied by a stock photo) headline: "Oregon health care worker hospitalized after allergic reaction to Moderna vaccine". Therefore, I'm thinking they're not getting much information at all about the vaccine, and what they are getting is biased.

The affected person was one out of 38,698 vaccinated as of yesterday in Oregon, where this took place. The article to which I link is from Oregon Public Broadcasting, not the unnamed source in the first paragraph.

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Three of my daughter’s friends, all mid-20s, have gotten the vaccine; two are nurses and one is an EMT. One reported some dizziness while driving home afterwards, but the other two only had soreness at the injection site. Her boyfriend’s brother, also a nurse, has tested positive for covid; not sure of all the details there, but he had been working in a covid ward and presumably got it before he could get vaccinated. Not sure how common dizziness is after this or any vaccine, but to me it would make sense to have a designated driver to take anyone getting the vaccine back home after the shot, just in case. 
 

That said, anyone can have a bad, even fatal, reaction to a vaccine, but it’s very rare. Some child in my hometown died decades ago from complications of getting a smallpox vaccine. While the covid vaccine may be contraindicated for some individuals, I will feel much safer when a much higher percentage of the population has received it. 

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9 minutes ago, BookWoman56 said:

Three of my daughter’s friends, all mid-20s, have gotten the vaccine; two are nurses and one is an EMT. One reported some dizziness while driving home afterwards, but the other two only had soreness at the injection site. Her boyfriend’s brother, also a nurse, has tested positive for covid; not sure of all the details there, but he had been working in a covid ward and presumably got it before he could get vaccinated. Not sure how common dizziness is after this or any vaccine, but to me it would make sense to have a designated driver to take anyone getting the vaccine back home after the shot, just in case. 
 

That said, anyone can have a bad, even fatal, reaction to a vaccine, but it’s very rare. Some child in my hometown died decades ago from complications of getting a smallpox vaccine. While the covid vaccine may be contraindicated for some individuals, I will feel much safer when a much higher percentage of the population has received it. 

This is a good reminder to stay hydrated at any time, and, if one is going to spend time waiting in a place where masks cannot be removed, be sure to drink water ahead of time (to prevent dizziness and faintness).

Probably my biggest concern at this point with my planned trip related to moving is how to stay hydrated without letting in germs (even by just lifting up my mask for a straw) or having to use the public toilet too much.

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You guys, I'm curious--are any of you who are working from home getting actually dressed in the mornings? Did you always, or was it a decision after it became clear that WFH would be an ongoing, prolonged thing? On one hand, I feel like I should, just to change things up a little and because I kind of miss my clothes! On the other, I feel like why create more laundry and add one more thing to do before logging in to work? Am I contemplating getting dressed only because I am bored with the repetitive routine? But it's not like I'd be getting dressed in the outfits I'd actually be wearing if I were going to an office, so how much of a difference would it make anyway?

Sorry to bust in with such a comparatively superficial post amid all of the thoughtful comments about vaccination. I'm going to go back and read them at some point; I'm just feeling the "caution fatigue" lately and have been kind of avoiding the topic this last week--I thought ignoring it all might help me relax during my PTO. It only sort of did.

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55 minutes ago, TattleTeeny said:

You guys, I'm curious--are any of you who are working from home getting actually dressed in the mornings? Did you always, or was it a decision after it became clear that WFH would be an ongoing, prolonged thing? On one hand, I feel like I should, just to change things up a little and because I kind of miss my clothes! On the other, I feel like why create more laundry and add one more thing to do before logging in to work? Am I contemplating getting dressed only because I am bored with the repetitive routine? But it's not like I'd be getting dressed in the outfits I'd actually be wearing if I were going to an office, so how much of a difference would it make anyway?

Sorry to bust in with such a comparatively superficial post amid all of the thoughtful comments about vaccination. I'm going to go back and read them at some point; I'm just feeling the "caution fatigue" lately and have been kind of avoiding the topic this last week--I thought ignoring it all might help me relax during my PTO. It only sort of did.

I only bother getting dressed on days that I need to turn my camera on(and then I only put a top on and leave my pj pants on).  

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58 minutes ago, TattleTeeny said:

You guys, I'm curious--are any of you who are working from home getting actually dressed in the mornings? Did you always, or was it a decision after it became clear that WFH would be an ongoing, prolonged thing? On one hand, I feel like I should, just to change things up a little and because I kind of miss my clothes! On the other, I feel like why create more laundry and add one more thing to do before logging in to work? Am I contemplating getting dressed only because I am bored with the repetitive routine? But it's not like I'd be getting dressed in the outfits I'd actually be wearing if I were going to an office, so how much of a difference would it make anyway?

 

For me, it depends on whether I'm on video meetings that day and to be honest, as summer went into fall, I ended up buying a bunch of fun, soft jammie pants that I could basically live in and then some plain t-shirt material type tops (but of a more flattering style than a t-shirt) that I can dress up with fun jewelry while still wearing said pants. 

Once jewelry is off, I can even sleep in the whole outfit.  I might wear the pants for more than one day & just change the shirts daily.  

In my In-Office Role, I was the one that was wearing nice dresses or dress pants w/ a nice top, sweater or jacket with heels, hair & face done, eclectic jewelry.  I moved from Boston to the canadian border of VT over a decade ago and my husband says I dress too fancy but it was what I liked.   

I miss dressing up though.   


An update regarding my kids Covid: Daughter & her husband so far have been milder cases... they're just miserable enough to be cranky with each other but not needing extra medical care at this point.  They live too far away from me but his brother dropped supplies at their door the other day and they're staying in of course.  Saw a snapchat that she was up to playing call of duty yesterday and she looked good. It sounds like his case is a bit worse than hers.

My son, the one who spent an hour with them on Christmas eve (distant but maskless) after she had her false negative result and a week before they found out they did have covid, has tested negative and he hasn't had any symptoms and is back at work.  Given his limited exposure and his negative test and a lack of symptoms on our part, our doctor said we wouldn't need to be tested.  

But given daughter's false negative test, I'm still worried. 

 

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