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Giant Misfit

COVID-19: This Topic Requires No Social Distancing

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These are interesting times, indeed. I'm staying at home; I'm working so I have stuff to do. My husband is restless and bored. He's trying to stay in because I want him too, but he "escapes" often, usually to go to the grocery. This morning he left to go visit his sister in a neighboring state for a couple of days. I kissed him goodbye without thinking, and now I am kicking myself for doing that. Every little slip up starts a new cycle of worry. 

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8 hours ago, statsgirl said:

This is a very good video on how to grocery shop safely from an M.D. It's 13 minutes long but lots of good suggestions if you can leave everything in the bag for 3 days.

 

This is a good video.  I’ve always considered myself a mild germophobe, but I clearly haven’t been careful enough with food packaging so far.  His comment about how other coronaviruses (and so likely this one) can stay active for up to two years in the freezer has freaked me out.  I feel like my kitchen is now a contamination zone (again, not because I am afraid the virus is in the food, but I touch my face all the time and I thought I was safe to do so in my own home, but if the packaging is contaminating every surface ....

His comment about buying for two weeks is helpful, but I did a grocery order this week, and about half of what I put on my list was not available (not even the replacement item).  I have enough nonperishables in my pantry to last me at least 4 weeks, but I’m nervous about running down that supply due to all the hoarding and who knows what the situation will be in 4 weeks when I absolutely would need to restock.  So I feel like I should be shopping weekly (in a non-hoarding manner) so as not to let my supplies dwindle.

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9 hours ago, Dani said:

SARS-CoV-2 is the virus that causes Covid-19. 

You're right.  I was trying to edit out the extraneous stuff, and I mistyped.  It was late, I was tired. The facts in the graph still hold, but I've deleted the entire post so I don't spread incorrect information.

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9 hours ago, statsgirl said:

This is a very good video on how to grocery shop safely from an M.D. It's 13 minutes long but lots of good suggestions if you can leave everything in the bag for 3 days.

 

I just want to provide this counterpoint from the NY Times article linked above (bolding mine):

Should I wipe jars and plastic containers when I get home? The majority of transmission of coronavirus is likely from close contact with an infected person. Viral particles do not survive well on paper or cardboard surfaces. And while the virus lasts longer on hard surfaces, contamination from jars and plastic containers is not a big risk. If it makes you feel better, Dr. Amler said, give them a quick wipe as you unpack.

Dr. Winetsky agreed that the risk of contamination from jars, cans or other containers “is infinitesimally small” and that you have to balance risk with anxiety. “I would not do this myself or really recommend it to other people,” he said. “This level of anxiety about sanitation can be harmful in and of itself.”

I worked in a biology lab in my younger days and honestly it's really, really hard to maintain a clean environment because of the risk of cross-contamination.  All you have to do is briefly touch the dirty side of the work area and forget to wash or change gloves when you move back to the clean side and now you've potentially contaminated your clean items again.   If you're living with someone who's high risk the extra cleaning is probably worthwhile, but I'm not convinced that it's useful for the general population.

FWIW, when I did my grocery shopping a couple of days ago, I cleaned my hands when entering the store and cleaned them again just before I left (and used a paper towel/wipe to hold the cart as I pushed it to the car).  Then when I got home I put everything straight into its final location and gave my hands a really good washing.  Hopefully that should be enough.

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3 hours ago, Kiki777 said:

What about produce, since it’s sitting out there in the stores?  Are people washing it in soap and water?

I just heard an interview  with one of the scientists who did that study on how long the Covid 2 virus lasts on different surfaces. (Interestingly it's been known before that copper has some antibacterial properties which is why the virus only lasts 4 hours on copper.)  His recommendation is to wash produce with some kind of wash like a mild soap. This is easier for things like oranges, melons and bananas or even apples where you can wash the outside than for broccoli or lettuce which has little nooks.  If you're cooking the broccoli you're okay because heat is very effective at killing the virus. Microwaving for even  a minute should work.

I bought a bag of tangerines and washed them before putting them in the bowl on the counter. Boxes and bags I just leave in the grocery bag in the hall closet for 3 or 4 days before putting them away.

He did say that food was an unlikely vector to catching it unless someone sneezed on the tomatoes. You're more likely to get it from another person or a smooth surface.

The study that found the virus on the cruise ship 17 days later found bits of the RNA, not replicatable virus.

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9 hours ago, statsgirl said:

This is a very good video on how to grocery shop safely from an M.D. It's 13 minutes long but lots of good suggestions if you can leave everything in the bag for 3 days.

 

I'm torn about whether to share this video or not. It's more than I am willing to do at this point, but he does clearly demonstrate how to disinfect if you want to --which at some point I might want to do.

But I wonder if I repost this, if it will be helpful or harmful for those who are already more worried about germs than is mentally (or physically?) good.

 


 

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My coronavirus quarantine resolutions - get dressed every day, go for a walk every day, do not binge eat the stash of chocolate.  I've managed two out of three . . . .

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14 minutes ago, Brookside said:

My coronavirus quarantine resolutions - get dressed every day, go for a walk every day, do not binge eat the stash of chocolate.  I've managed two out of three . . . .

Getting dressed is my rule too.  If I'd stay in my gown, it would be all downhill from there.
And for those who can't find bread, I came across this easy recipe.

 

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Yesterday & today I participated in Zoom virtual get togethers with two social groups. It felt so good to see those wonderful people, and just shoot the breeze with them (like we used to do back when life was normal).  Now I'm thinking of maybe doing a mini family reunion on Zoom with my sister & her kids. 

3 minutes ago, auntjess said:

Getting dressed is my rule too.  If I'd stay in my gown, it would be all downhill from there.
And for those who can't find bread, I came across this easy recipe.

 

She's so funny! I just discovered her a few days ago.

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5 hours ago, suomi said:

I've wondered about that. When you peel an orange you touch the fruit inside while you're peeling it. When you cut or slice a melon the knife introduces what's on the outside to the inside. When you peel a banana I guess you could drop it on a plate or some other surface before touching it with your hands - how careful do we need to be? 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/26/well/eat/coronavirus-shopping-food-groceries-infection.html?action=click&module=Top Stories&pgtype=Homepage

I've always washed fruit and vegetables with a bit of dish soap and water. Produce is nasty, and has been long before now.

4 hours ago, roamyn said:

I live in Wake Cty, and there’s talk of a county wide stay home.  HOWEVER, when u see the list of exempted industries that are “essential”, it appears very few will have to stay home.

Hubby works for a ServPro type company that deals with electronic recovery (ie computers & appliances), and they’re considered essential.  I work for a wholesaler where Duke Energy is our biggest client, and we’re considered essential.

It makes no sense to have shut in orders, if you exempt beyond Groceries/Drugstores, Agriculture, gas stations, trucking, dat care, pet care, and healthcare.

Playing golf is still allowed here, because that's considered "exercise". You can tell who makes laws here in Bankertown, USA.

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2 hours ago, shapeshifter said:

I'm torn about whether to share this video or not. It's more than I am willing to do at this point, but he does clearly demonstrate how to disinfect if you want to --which at some point I might want to do.

But I wonder if I repost this, if it will be helpful or harmful for those who are already more worried about germs than is mentally (or physically?) good.

 


 

There is no evidence that the virus can be transmitted from food packaging, per the FDA. I am currently having a hard time leaving my home because of existing social anxiety and agoraphobia that is magnified by the pandemic. I can't let myself go into a panic about the virus being on cardboard, steel or whatever. If that were the case, I think we would've seen far more cases in the U.S. much earlier on, contracted from products that were shipped from China. That's a completely unscientific understanding of the situation, but that's how I get through the day.

Edited by bilgistic
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37 minutes ago, bilgistic said:

Playing golf is still allowed here, because that's considered "exercise". You can tell who makes laws here in Bankertown, USA.

I'm no golfer, but it is exercise - at least as much as dog walking.  And it can easily be done while maintaining 6 feet of distance between golfers and/or employees.  So why not?

In my state, they tried to leave parks and such open, but people weren't following social distancing guidelines.  It's unfortunate, because I think being able to get outdoors is so important right now.  😞

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Playing golf is still allowed here, too, as are other outdoor pursuits like hiking and biking.  But the rules of social distancing apply -- tough on some of the narrower, more well-travelled trails, but possible.

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I don't want to belabor the point, but I found this really interesting article from the Washington Post that explains why the risk of transmission via groceries and takeout is so low:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/03/26/dont-panic-about-shopping-getting-delivery-or-accepting-packages/

In case it's behind a paywall, the article basically says that the half-life of the virus on most packaging materials can be measured in hours, so the viral load drops quickly.  And there's only a significant load in the first place if the items were handled by someone who is infected but with minimal symptoms (because a visibly ill person would presumably be sent home) who didn't practice good hygiene and touched your item.  I found it very reassuring.  @bilgistic, hopefully this will help a little with your anxiety too. 

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41 minutes ago, bilgistic said:

I can't let myself go into a panic about the virus being on cardboard, steel or whatever. If that were the case, I think we would've seen far more cases in the U.S. much earlier on, contracted from products that were shipped from China.

Excellent points!  And I totally agree that I just can't worry about it.  I mean, where does it end?  If the bags were in my car, do I need to wipe down my seats?  If I come in the house and sit them on the floor, is my kitchen now contaminated?  At some point, there's a rule of diminishing returns on all the sanitizing and disinfecting, and I have to just get on with it.  And I personally am a little leery about using chemicals around my food.

Everybody has to do what they're comfortable with, and if people feel more secure by doing all the cleaning, go for it.  But if I stay home as much as possible, practice social distancing when I'm forced to be out, use hand sanitizer, wash my hands as soon as I get home, and keep my hands off my face, I feel like that's enough.  If there's some infinitesimal chance that I get the virus off a package, c'est la vie.  I've got to draw the line somewhere between regular life and sealing myself into a clean room.

(Granted, I might feel differently if I was in a high-risk group, or caring for someone who is.)

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50 minutes ago, Browncoat said:

Playing golf is still allowed here, too, as are other outdoor pursuits like hiking and biking.  But the rules of social distancing apply -- tough on some of the narrower, more well-travelled trails, but possible.

That didn't even last a week here; the parks and trails were crowded as hell the first weekend, and most people completely ignored the rules of social distancing, so now they're effectively closed.

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I just made my first delivery order via the Mercato website with a health food store.  The guy called me up re substitutions and told me they were out of dry garbanzo beans!  I guess there are a lot of people out there doing long term cooking.

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IMO, golf hasn't been a form of exercise since they made golf carts available. Back in the day, when golfers walked the course...that was exercise.

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1 hour ago, Bastet said:

That didn't even last a week here; the parks and trails were crowded as hell the first weekend, and most people completely ignored the rules of social distancing, so now they're effectively closed.

They closed Great Smoky Mountain National Park and the section of the Blue Ridge Parkway near the park because so many people came out last weekend. The place was mobbed, and people weren't staying away from one another.

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You’ve Got Mail. Will You Get the Coronavirus?

The practice of disinfecting mail dates back to the invention of quarantine. There’s little evidence it needs to be invoked today.

The first formal process for curbing the spread of infection by detaining travelers from an affected region until their health was proved was instituted in what is now Dubrovnik, Croatia, in 1377, against the bubonic plague. (This temporal buffer was originally 30 days, but when that proved too short, it was extended to 40 days, or quaranta giorni, from which we derive the word “quarantine.”)

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/24/health/coronavirus-mail-packages.html?searchResultPosition=2

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L.A. County's health department updates a spreadsheet every day showing the total number of confirmed cases in the county and then breaking down those cases by area.  I just checked today's update, and the number in my area doubled from yesterday. 

It's quite telling that, with testing capacity still limited, almost all the areas with the highest number of confirmed cases are wealthier areas (Melrose, Brentwood, and West Hollywood the top three).

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Thanks to those who posted more reassuring articles about food and grocery contamination!

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38 minutes ago, Bastet said:

It's quite telling that, with testing capacity still limited, almost all the areas with the highest number of confirmed cases are wealthier areas (Melrose, Brentwood, and West Hollywood the top three).

Does it show the number of tests that have been done, or just the positives? I'm wondering if wealthier areas show a higher percentage of positives at the beginning of the "curve". This thing is so closely tied to travel - especially international travel - which tends to be the arena of the rich.

I figured that's part of the reason urban areas were hit first - much higher rates of travel. (Plus much closer "living" in general.)

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8 hours ago, Blergh said:

So just rinsing off apples in water no longer does the trick re this stuff? Uh-oh!

Probably goes for rubbing them on my pant leg, too.

 

21 hours ago, Thumper said:

What are your thoughts on takeout?  Helping out businesses or potentially contributing to virus spread?

I'm torn.  On the one hand, really?  That's an essential service?  But on the other, it is a business that is open and paying employees.  But on the third hand, most of the action I see is at chain restaurants like McDonald's or the like.  Of course those are providing jobs (and they might be owned by a local franchisee), but if the purpose is to save what most of us think of as locally owned restaurants, it's probably not doing much good.

Plus I don't think it's any safer than shopping at a department store.  Target and Walmart can be open because they sell groceries, but they also sell similar items to what Kohl's, for example.  But Kohl's is closed. 

At In-N-Out, they have their usual long lines, with employees at people's car windows taking orders on a tablet.  There's no touching going on (I hope), but I think the ordering should be done via the speaker thing, even if it means the lines move slower.

 

2 minutes ago, Bastet said:

It's quite telling that, with testing capacity still limited, almost all the areas with the highest number of confirmed cases are wealthier areas (Melrose, Brentwood, and West Hollywood the top three).

Are you implying it's because the wealthy have more access to tests?  I wouldn't be surprised if they do.

Because I would think that people living in those areas, especially some place like Brentwood, would have to go out of their way to be in close proximity to other people, so I wouldn't expect the actual rate of infection to be significantly higher there than other areas, and probably actually lower.

I do know that a couple of weeks ago, there were some people in a very wealthy suburb of D.C. who were planning to cope with the closed schools by arranging play groups.  It would be interesting to study the rate of compliance by income level.

But I just noticed @Jane Tuesday's theory about international travel.  I like it, and it's definitely less judge-y than mine.

 

1 hour ago, annzeepark914 said:

IMO, golf hasn't been a form of exercise since they made golf carts available. Back in the day, when golfers walked the course...that was exercise.

What?  You're saying swinging a club 150 times isn't exercise?  That's Cross Fit level effort.  Actually, probably 50 of those are putts, so maybe not.

FWIW, on the rare occasions I do play (hence the 150 strokes), I always walk.  But maybe the prohibition on golf has to do with two unrelated people riding in a cart.  In addition to people's general inability to follow rules, which should never be discounted.

 

2 hours ago, Bastet said:

That didn't even last a week here; the parks and trails were crowded as hell the first weekend, and most people completely ignored the rules of social distancing, so now they're effectively closed.

I'll confess that I do not like hiking so I don't get the appeal of being on a trail, especially one you've been on before.  But honestly--in a time like this, if people want to walk, can't they just go out the front door?  I rode my bike at a leisurely pace last Sunday all around the tiny downtown and adjoining neighborhoods, and had no problem keeping my distance from others on the rare occasion I encountered one at all.

In a related note, on the news in Phoenix, there was a story about a girl who was sad that she couldn't have a party on her 18th birthday.  So her mother arranged for a parade to go by their house, which seems kind of nice  The girl stood in her driveway as a line of cars with signs on them slowly drove by, with some of the people in the cars handing her presents through the car window (including an old lady), and some cars with 3 or 4 teenage girls in them

As far as I know, Arizona isn't on lockdown or anything, but it's pretty obvious to me that riding in a car with someone who's not in my own household is a big no-no unless it's the only way I could get somewhere like the pharmacy or something, and then what other choice do you have?  Or am I just being too strict, and expecting too much of parents?  Because it seems simple enough to say, "You can't ride in a car with anyone else."

I was at O'Reilly Auto Parts today (talk about an essential business!), and they had an X on the floor about 4 feet from the counter.  As I approached the counter, the employee stepped back away from the counter.  I put my stuff down and backed up to the X, at which point the employee stepped forward to the counter to ring it up.  He stepped back when I was doing my credit card.

It seems kind of silly, but it worked, and it's a lot better than what the employees manning the self-checkout area at stores are doing at grocery stores.  I guess they figure what the hell, they're surrounded by people all day long.

 

 

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Evangeline Lilly Apologizes for ''Arrogant'' Coronavirus Comments

Quote

"I want to offer my sincere and heartfelt apology for the insensitivity I showed in my previous post to the very real suffering and fear that has gripped the world through COVID19," Lilly continued. "Grandparents, parents, children, sisters and brothers are dying, the world is rallying to find a way to stop this very real threat, and my ensuing silence has sent a dismissive, arrogant and cryptic message."

A.K.A "now you all know how stupid I am, & I've screwed up my career"

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18 minutes ago, StatisticalOutlier said:

Are you implying it's because the wealthy have more access to tests?

Yes.  The public health department only lists lab-confirmed cases.  This virus is everywhere, but testing capacity is limited, so what the data really shows is the areas where more people have been able to get tested.  If you're in a wealthier area, your local medical facilities, with greater resources, have greater ability to test you.  Thus, in this time when we're still just getting going on testing, we're seeing the most confirmed cases in those areas, because that's where more testing is happening.  Confirmed case data is not yet actually telling us where the virus occurs the most, because of limited testing.

Edited by Bastet
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4 hours ago, Jane Tuesday said:

(Granted, I might feel differently if I was in a high-risk group, or caring for someone who is.)

I'm in the old group, but I can't deal with "I'm gonna die because I didn't wash my soda bottles and cheese package." 
Truly, it never  occurred to me until I read some of the articles and the scary video.
I wash my hands often, use wipes on door handles, faucets, etc. a couple of times a day.

 

 

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6 hours ago, Brookside said:

My coronavirus quarantine resolutions - get dressed every day, go for a walk every day, do not binge eat the stash of chocolate.  I've managed two out of three . . . .

Which two?

I get up and get dressed every day and work from home while also giving my son schoolwork to do. The schools aren't sending out work yet, but I found some online for him to do. He also has a lot of time for just reading because he usually finishes the worksheets pretty quick. Then we go for a walk or to a playground at lunch. (The playgrounds are usually empty, and we use hand sanitizer before going back home.) We also do some exercise from Go Noodle in the morning. It's a kids' channel (we got it on Roku), but I recommend it. It's pretty good exercise.

3 hours ago, roseha said:

I just made my first delivery order via the Mercato website with a health food store.  The guy called me up re substitutions and told me they were out of dry garbanzo beans!  I guess there are a lot of people out there doing long term cooking.

I think there a lot of people out there finding out they don't know how to cook the stuff they bought.

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45 minutes ago, Bastet said:

If you're in a wealthier area, your local medical facilities, with greater resources, have greater ability to test you.  Thus, in this time when we're still just getting going on testing, we're seeing the most confirmed cases in those areas, because that's where more testing is happening.  Confirmed case data is not yet actually telling us where the virus occurs the most, because of limited testing.

It makes me sad that this reads as an accepted and almost acceptable situation. 

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6 hours ago, Brookside said:

My coronavirus quarantine resolutions - get dressed every day, go for a walk every day, do not binge eat the stash of chocolate.  I've managed two out of three . . . .

Wait. Is it even possible to have a stash of chocolate? Sounds like an oxymoron to me. 😉

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Fellow ballet fans of New York City, I'm sorry to report that the New York City Ballet has decided to cancel it's spring season.

The dominoes just keep falling. . .

I'm guessing the American Ballet Theater is next. 

If this isn't the right place for such a post, I apologize.

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I'm not in New York (or anywhere near), but I just assumed that all the things like that in New York had already canceled.

I also rode a bike today for the first time in at least 30 years (excluding stationary bikes, which don't count because you don't have to balance or steer them). A co-worker who lives nearby offered me her extra bike for the duration. It was fun, although a little scary at first. The first thing I did was accidentally go in a circle. It was also scary because I live in a larger town than I grew up in, and there is more traffic here, even now. I stuck to quieter residential streets but they still aren't as quiet as where I grew up. They are also oddly narrower, and more people park on the side of the street.

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5 minutes ago, auntlada said:

I'm not in New York (or anywhere near), but I just assumed that all the things like that in New York had already canceled.

I think everything was kind of a holding pattern to see if things had improved by then. That's why most places had a restart/reopen date for sometime in April. 

Is anyone else going crazy because they can't go to the gym? I can still run, fortunately, but I miss my strength training.

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I went to the grocery store tonight after work (I still have to go in as my work is considered "essential to life") and noticed that the store had put taped arrows on the floor to direct shoppers which way they were to enter each aisle. I thought, wow! This is great! You know who didn't think it was great? Everyone else who chose to ignore the arrows or simply think because the store was not very crowded that the directional arrows didn't apply to them.  I mean, Jesus Christ, how hard is this?! I just wanted some chocolate ice cream and this couple -- going the wrong way down the freezer section aisle -- wouldn't stop pushing their damn cart together. I basically had to pass them while wiping the freezer case on the other side with my shoulder. Then, I wanted to get cereal. I entered the aisle appropriately but AGAIN another couple was there coming from the opposite direction blocking the way and would have been way too close to me had I passed. So, instead of getting Cheerios like I wanted, I bought Alpha Bits because that was the first box I could get to and the furthest away from them. 

People are such fucking inconsiderate, stupid assholes where I live.  

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2 minutes ago, Giant Misfit said:

People are such fucking inconsiderate, stupid assholes where I live.  

Not just where you live.

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“I’m okay. Don’t tell Mom and Dad. They’ll worry,” he wrote to his sister. He may be the first nurse in New York City to die from the coronavirus.

“He used to carry around a thick notepad holder that hides a box full of chocolates and candies so he can have it handy to give out to miserable/ grumbly nurses and doctors who are more likely than not ‘hangry,’” Joanne Loo, a nurse at Mount Sinai West, posted on Facebook on Wednesday.

But nursing was not his first vocation. A native of Lansing, Michigan, Mr. Kelly moved to New York more than 20 years ago to pursue a career as a dancer, his sister said. He then went to nursing school and worked as a nurse at Mount Sinai West, before being promoted to the post of assistant manager in the telemetry department.

His family is now trying to bring his body back to Michigan.

“We know we can’t have a service anytime soon, but we want him home,” Ms. Sherron said. “He died alone. We want him home now.”

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/26/nyregion/nurse-dies-coronavirus-mount-sinai.html?action=click&module=Top Stories&pgtype=Homepage

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4 hours ago, Bastet said:

That didn't even last a week here; the parks and trails were crowded as hell the first weekend, and most people completely ignored the rules of social distancing, so now they're effectively closed.

Most places in Ontario and British Columbia were closed except for hiking trails and outdoor areas. Then a warm day hit, people swarmed out and didn't keep any social distance. The next day, the outdoor facilities were closed. Toronto has now closed all parks, playgrounds and dog areas.

28 minutes ago, supposebly said:

It makes me sad that this reads as an accepted and almost acceptable situation. 

If any good comes out of this, it will be that people re-examine their their beliefs about medical care and a basic guaranteed income.

5 minutes ago, Camille said:

Is anyone else going crazy because they can't go to the gym? I can still run, fortunately, but I miss my strength training.

I've seen some interesting adaptations to home training. A bottle of bleach serves as a kettle weight, cans as free weights.

Serge Ibaka, the Toronto Raptor, has put out some videos of how he keeps up his training in his apartment.

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For people who don't like to read graphs, it breaks down to "Plastic: 72 hours, Stainless Steel: 48 hours, Cardboard: 48 hours, Copper: 8 hours."  This is from the New England Journal of Medicine, a pretty reliable source.

That's pretty good to know.  I assume the copper statistic applies to brass as well, due to the high copper content.  Brass doorknobs will disinfect themselves over about 8 hours.

11 hours ago, Blergh said:

So just rinsing off apples in water no longer does the trick re this stuff? Uh-oh!

Funny, I've been washing off apples with soap and water for years because of all the wax they put on them.

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I did not know we have a COVID-19 topic. Very cool to be able to chat about this in a reasonable place!

I live south of Seattle, so I'm actually lucky enough to be able to WFH right now. I'm in a higher risk group, so this is actually my 3rd week at home. I'm not sure how my job really feels about it though. Some of my coworkers are still at the office, for some inane reason.

My SO is taking time off, because he's in retail, and though he's closer to a high risk age group, he's mostly worried about bringing the virus home to me.

I have no idea what we'll do in a few weeks when he'll likely have to go back though. People are so damn inconsiderate in the stores. He got to the point where he was asking people to stay back from him (nicely!) and they were throwing attitude.

Around groceries, I *thought* I was being careful, and then watched that video. Ugh. I am a little nervous about produce, even though I wash everything with veggie wash. Who knows, right now? I just wash my hands before I eat anything with my hands (chips, etc.) in addition to all the usual hand-washing and sanitizing.

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8 minutes ago, statsgirl said:

If any good comes out of this, it will be that people re-examine their their beliefs about medical care and a basic guaranteed income.

Similarly, I've been thinking the good that could come out of this is people re-examining their beliefs in general (including "about medical care and a basic guaranteed income"), but that only works if those who survive aren't stupid, and stupid people cause a lot of smart people to die. And by "smart" and "stupid" I don't mean necessarily academically. I knew a mentally challenged young man who was always the smartest person in the room according to the definition of "smart" and "stupid" as I'm using them here.

But don't ask me to define "smart" and "stupid" as I am using them here. I'm not smart that way.

But I know what I mean by "stupid" when I am walking along a park path and see stupid people parking their butts in spots that require others to stumble through the bushes to maintain 6-foot (or 1 moose-length) distances, and I am thinking "Stupid!" so loudly that I would think they could hear.

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55 minutes ago, shapeshifter said:

Wait. Is it even possible to have a stash of chocolate? Sounds like an oxymoron to me. 😉

My "panic buy" when this all started was eight bars of Theo's cherry and almond dark chocolate (normally I never buy more than two bars at a time). I've been able to ration myself to two squares a day. My motivation is to put off my next grocery store visit for as long as possible.

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51 minutes ago, auntlada said:

I also rode a bike today for the first time in at least 30 years (excluding stationary bikes, which don't count because you don't have to balance or steer them). A co-worker who lives nearby offered me her extra bike for the duration. It was fun, although a little scary at first. The first thing I did was accidentally go in a circle.

You go where you look.  So don't look down.  Keep your head up and look ahead.  Even when mountainbiking over obstacles, you position yourself well before the obstacle and then look way ahead as you go over it.  It's unnerving at first, but it works.

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16 minutes ago, CrazyDog said:

I just wash my hands before I eat anything with my hands (chips, etc.)

I haven't eaten out of shared bowls of chips or anything else in 40 years --when I got the flu while pregnant with my first child after politely sharing guacamole with generous (but ill) hosts.
It's like I've been preparing for Covid-19 since then.
After having 3 kids with little income or health insurance, I worked closely for 20 years with teen and young adult students. I haven't touched my eyes, nose, or mouth without washing my hands in at least 20 years.
BTW, I do not use hand sanitizer. It's either soap and water or don't touch the face for me.

Edited by shapeshifter
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9 minutes ago, chocolatine said:

My "panic buy" when this all started was eight bars of Theo's cherry and almond dark chocolate (normally I never buy more than two bars at a time). I've been able to ration myself to two squares a day. My motivation is to put off my next grocery store visit for as long as possible.

Mine a few weeks ago (thank you to all the scientists who were calmly telling people that they may want to consider slowly stocking two months ago) was a giant thing of animal crackers from Costco. Tasty, but not something I'd be tempted to inhale either. We did crack them open though 🙂

Despite being home a lot, we're actually keeping the stress and boredom snacking in check. I think mostly because we want to avoid the stores as much as possible.

I hate everything that's happening, but I can't deny there are some lessons to be re-learned. Slow down, spend more time at home with family (even when they're annoying the crap out of you, lol), don't waste food or resources, walk more, appreciate all the basics that many of us are fortunate to have, and a growing sense of community to help those that don't.

I just wish it didn't take this global horror to make some of these things stand out. 

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38 minutes ago, Lugal said:

Funny, I've been washing off apples with soap and water for years because of all the wax they put on them.

So have I. When I was little, it was always my job to wash the fruits after we got back from the grocery store and my mother taught me that trick.

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27 minutes ago, CrazyDog said:

I live south of Seattle, so I'm actually lucky enough to be able to WFH right now.

Had to google your acronym.  I even got the "F" wrong, and I was trying to make the other letters work, but I couldn't figure why you'd be glad to wear heels or hose.
And a  less scary grocery article.
 https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/03/26/dont-panic-about-shopping-getting-delivery-or-accepting-packages/?fbclid=IwAR3dk5BotAs4fEbVVMhVAv5rO4-HU9mRQULbjKCK1v9SSu5AqLUn_xSGCc4

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