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statsgirl

Transplant

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An ER doctor, who fled his native Syria to come to Canada, must overcome numerous obstacles to resume a career in the high stakes world of emergency medicine.

Pilot episode aired last night.  Pretty intense. "Brilliant doctor save all" show like so many but I like the twist that he's Syrian, speaking Arabic to his countrymen, and facing both prejudice and administrative hurdles.

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It was intense indeed! I kept thinking "Quit sneaking around hiding under your hoodie! You're not looking less suspicious!" "Use your words! Talk to people!" 

I liked his little sister. 

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Enjoyed the show and the cast, and I don't usually watch medical dramas.  We found the background music overwhelmingly loud though.

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Caught the first two episodes on demand. Loved it and found a decent show for Wednesday nights.

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The difficulty he had getting his transcripts is true for many refugees. And not just because someone is an enemy of the state. With universities and other institutions being under attack, damaged, looted, destroyed, or just not running any more, it's often impossible for refugees to prove their education. 

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Co-sign on the difficulty of getting papers into Canada.  I know someone who left during law studies but because she can't get her papers, she has to do a year of high school before she can get into first year university. And re-take her driver's test because she only has a photo of her driver's license and not the paperwork.

I really like how realistic the show is in terms of what it's like to be a refugee in Canada. In fact, the most unrealistic parts are that he even got a chance to be a medical resident, and that his 12 year old sister is taking night classes in ESL (because the local schools have half day ESL at her level at least for now).

I like that they have the arc with his Libyan friend who was refused asylum in Canada. We're shown that he's a good guy and he wants to work and be a good citizen but by hiding, he's breaking the law.  It really is a dilemma.

I also like that instead of the usual anti-vaxxer parent, this one had a good reason i.e. that his son had a bad reaction to his first vaccinations.

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I like how Bash isn't impossibly noble and virtuous, he's more than a little resentful and frustrated. And he's arrogant, which he comes by honestly because of his skill. I like how an immigrant/refugee is allowed to be imperfect.

Between Transplant and Diggstown (where is our forum, PTV?), this is a quiet golden age for Canadian TV.

Edited by marinw
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I used to live in NY and met people who were immigrants (and some who were possibly refugees) and they often did jobs that had nothing to do with their training. My buildings super (from Bosnia or Montenegro) was a higher up in the military. I met cab drivers who were multi-lingual and had been bankers or in other white-collar jobs. And I don't mean this as a dis to blue collar work. It's necessary and vital. 

A GP in my hometown (in Western Kansas) is from Vietnam. He was already a doctor there and had to re-do medical school completely when he got to the US. (Which I believe was more due to the US not recognizing his credentials, not lost transcripts, but still). 

Here in Germany (where I live now) there was a story about two Syrian brothers in the paper. One came more than ten years ago, married a German woman, and has a job, a life, kids,and is totally settled. The other came as a refugee. He's a dentist, which is a valuable and needed skill here, but can't practice. I don't know if it's because of transcripts (the German government loooooves paperwork), or because of his refugee status. But what a waste. Instead he has to do some menial labor job.  

 

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13 hours ago, marinw said:

 

Between Transplant and Diggstown (where is our forum, PTV?), this is a quiet golden age for Canadian TV.

The Golden age for Canadian TV is when "The Littlest Hobo" aired 🙂 back in the late 70s and early 80s. 

Seriously though, it's definitely a great time for Canadian TV and the Canadian film industry has been promoting that recently with commercials highlighting all the great things that have been coming out of Canada recently.

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30 minutes ago, Thomas Crown said:

it's definitely a great time for Canadian TV and the Canadian film industry has been promoting that recently with commercials highlighting all the great things that have been coming out of Canada recently.

CBC's deals with Netflix helps, although that is a topic well beyond the scope of this Forum

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This show is so Canadian!  I love it!

Bashir feels guilty that he's in Canada and not helping in Syria where he is really needed. (Nice acting on Haq's part.) But he's in Canada because he needs to protect his sister.

Hunter finds out that Bashir is talking to a White Hat in Syria while on duty and instead of handing him in, helps.

The school has a notification system. And it malfunctions.

The doctor doesn't break PHIPA (see that, Chicago Med) and the drunk driver turns himself in.

The White Hats really are considered enemies of the state in Syria.

On 3/16/2020 at 9:06 AM, TrixieTrue said:

A GP in my hometown (in Western Kansas) is from Vietnam. He was already a doctor there and had to re-do medical school completely when he got to the US. (Which I believe was more due to the US not recognizing his credentials, not lost transcripts, but still). 

Here in Germany (where I live now) there was a story about two Syrian brothers in the paper. One came more than ten years ago, married a German woman, and has a job, a life, kids,and is totally settled. The other came as a refugee. He's a dentist, which is a valuable and needed skill here, but can't practice. I don't know if it's because of transcripts (the German government loooooves paperwork), or because of his refugee status. But what a waste. Instead he has to do some menial labor job. 

It is extremely difficult to get credentials transferred to a different country even if you're not a refugee partly because other countries may not trust the schools you attended to provide an equal education to theirs, and partly because some professions like medicine are a union closed shop (a doctor trained in Canada cannot practice in the US and vice versa).

Your Vietnamese GP was lucky that he got a chance to redo his credentials. Many doctors can't.

On 3/16/2020 at 5:48 AM, marinw said:

Between Transplant and Diggstown (where is our forum, PTV?), this is a quiet golden age for Canadian TV.

Your wish is my command.

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6 hours ago, statsgirl said:

Your Vietnamese GP was lucky that he got a chance to redo his credentials. Many doctors can't.

I wonder why that is. If someone wants to go to medical school, takes the MCAT (or whatever is needed) and can afford it (or more likely, get some loans), why not? It's great to have doctors from different backgrounds. 

He's a really great doctor and many of his patients are immigrants. It's not hard to find Spanish speaking doctors, but it's great that the Vietnamese community in my little town had someone they could comfortably speak to. We have fewer immigrants from Vietnam today, but his practice still sees a lot of immigrants, because (this is only my opinion) people see him as own of their own. He understands much of what they've been through and is a success story in his own right. 

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Intense episode! I liked how the helicopter dad who was freaking out about a school drop out gained perspective and became Bash's ally.

Unexpected but welcome resolution of Bash's transcript issues.

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On 3/19/2020 at 5:15 AM, TrixieTrue said:

I wonder why that is. If someone wants to go to medical school, takes the MCAT (or whatever is needed) and can afford it (or more likely, get some loans), why not? It's great to have doctors from different backgrounds.

It's very competitive to get into medical school. At the University of Toronto, which Bashir's residency would most likely be associated with, the acceptance rate is 4%.  It's even lower at some other medical schools.

The Vietnamese doctor would have been competing against students who have cut out everything else in their lives to get into med school and worked for years on research projects for free to get recommendations to get in.

It would be wonderful if everyone who wanted to get in and did the work (MCATs and GPA) could get into medical school. Sadly, it's not the way it is right now.

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On 3/19/2020 at 6:15 AM, TrixieTrue said:

I wonder why that is. If someone wants to go to medical school, takes the MCAT (or whatever is needed) and can afford it (or more likely, get some loans), why not? It's great to have doctors from different backgrounds. 

Perhaps our current reality will inspire the Canadian medical bureaucracy to reconsider and simplify this process.

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