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msmarjoribanks

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  1. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    I was just coming here to complain about the lack of information on the new Chicago episode. You can't show places in the Chicago area and not mention the neighborhoods or burbs and have it mean anything. It was also ridiculous that the realtor was going on about the third place being cheaper because it was in the burbs and not noting that it was also smaller and I couldn't tell about parking (the first place had a 2 car garage, as well as some other features not mentioned). The area the first one was in looked familiar, so when they picked it I found it -- Edgebrook. Cool location right by the forest preserve, but very family-centric, and definitely a NW side suburban feel. Location is easy bus to blue line (but that would be close to an hour) or -- what was referenced -- drive to train. The Metra Edgebrook stop is about 1.3 miles away. I liked the place they got, it was my definite pick of the 3, but I don't think I'd choose to live in that area although it has its pluses and it was cool to see the area featured. (I like to bike around there.)
  2. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    This was a repeat of a Chicago episode where the dog decided. In that one they made a point of saying the owners had all okay'd it. I assume the same here, although I cringed when he was outside and then running around inside while dirty (although he was super cute). Did anyone watch the Ann Arbor rerun? (I should find the comments from the time, but accidentally deleted the date.)
  3. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    I thought they were going to pick the last house too, but it was over their budget. I know they didn't really even see it when looking, but I do think the $400K was probably a hard stop, and that the first ended up being quite a bit lower was a plus. I really hope they had a good inspector and hired a specialist who could check out all the scary-looking water marks. I get being burned if you had an expensive problem with the last house, but don't get thinking what they saw is no biggie since, hey!, it passed the silly marble test. (None of the houses on my street would pass the marble test, but not because of foundation issues but because they were not built to adjust for the slight slope here back when they were built over 100 years ago.) I think the can't have toilet in the same room as shower was her made up quirk for the show, but it was annoying -- if you need a palatial master look at new houses. Wanting to paint the bannisters white bothered me too, but oh well. The whole thing about how she really wanted a ranch so might go with the small second one with the shared bathroom was ridiculous too -- no one really cares about style that much. (HHers seems obsessed with casting people who supposedly want a house exactly the style of the one they grew up in or grandma's, which seems odd.)
  4. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    I just watched this, and was shocked about the one they chose. Google maps said that the one that wasn't great but was where the wife grew up was 30-45 min from Manhattan, the first one with the pool (which is what I expected them to take) was about an hour, and the one they did take was like 1.5 hours. Terrible, and the difference in the houses would not be worth that for me (I liked the first house better, personally). Hope there's some kind of good public transportation. Watched the NYC one too -- crazy (although not unexpected) how much places were. I found it very interesting and for once liked the diversity of areas being shown (Midtown, Brooklyn, and Harlem).
  5. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    Now Houston -- some really nice houses, but expensive.
  6. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    Watching some reruns. Clemson, SC, Sacramento, and Tampa. Prices are much more reasonable.
  7. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    I own a house in Chicago built in 1910, and researched the history. The first owners both died between 1930 (when their 3 children were still living with them) and 1940. In 1940, their older daughter was living their with her husband and her younger sister, and their brother was living a couple of miles away. The older daughter (then a widow) died in 1993 and left the house to her (then married) younger sister, who owned it until she (as a widow) died in 2004. So the same family lived in the house for 94 years. It seems that neither of the sisters had children and the brother moved to Florida. The neighborhood the original owners were living in before moving here was the same area the son lived in in 1940. I think this kind of thing was more common in the past.
  8. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    Yeah, it was bugging me that they weren't more specific about the locations, since I know that area some.
  9. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    I finally watched this one (I haven't been watching for a while, just too much else going on, and had to catch up on the Chicago ones first). I thought this comment was puzzling -- I guess she meant she wanted them painted white, but that's an easy fix. Otherwise, no clue what else she would mean. That aside, I really liked the HH (the cousin was annoying, but clearly playing a role), and as a Chicagoan I enjoyed seeing properties in Kenwood, Bronzeville, and Edgewater (and when I last looked I looked a lot in Edgewater, although I bought in Lincoln Square). I was surprised they didn't show her a no-chance high rise in the South Loop like the cousin was pushing for, just because they often do that. Beyond the weird closet door comment, the HHers comments were quite similar to the ones I would make. I thought the layout of the kitchen in the re-done place was weird, mainly the way the breakfast bar was slanted and too small, and that was part of the reno, so not due to vintage. Also, the granite becoming the backsplash is a look I personally hate, so I'm with her there. The distance to the rest of the house was due to vintage, but that was mainly the cousin having issues. I predicted she'd go with the first (faux vintage or not -- and I too would have preferred real vintage). Ultimately between those three places the issues are (1) neighborhood (all fine neighborhoods, so a matter of preference); and (2) price (I really liked the third one, but there's a big difference between the assessments if you aren't someone who really wants a high rise elevator building). That said, the first place that she went with really did have a great cook's kitchen from what I saw. My kitchen is fine, but still I was envious.
  10. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    I rolled my eyes at this one. I actually thought the first one (the RE agent suggested it was aged at 2001 which is idiotic) with the pool was perfect for them (it had minor projects they could have done before moving in, paint the cabinet, install the pot filler thing, the island was fine), but it was farther out than they wanted (I wonder if they were kicking themselves when looking, since we know they were already under contract). I also loved the charming Lexington 1880s place that had the best location, although it was much less practical. I thought the one they got had no character and was going to be really close in to their neighbors. I'm close in to my neighbors, but I'm in a city where my 30x125 lot is bigger than the standard. If I were in a basically suburban new construction area, that would be a deal killer.
  11. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    Yeah, agreed. Often people buy/rent a small place assuming they will sell when they marry, so wait. He probably decided he just needed to go forward on his own, wanted to stay in the area (it's a nice area), and just get what he wanted, which meant a place with a big bedroom (workable with a spouse or girlfriend/boyfriend if that happens, or if gf/bf is just tv adverse), an office, a cool roof deck, and the kind of open entertaining space and new fixtures that I can see appealing to a single guy. It's not what I'd buy, but if he wants it, good for him. I'm glad he didn't get extra bedrooms for the SIL. That place (barring an economic turndown) should hold its value for 10 years before he has to update seriously, so if he marries and has kids he should be fine.
  12. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    I think I read somewhere that they require two people.
  13. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    Yeah, agreed. I live in Chicago and the market isn't that crazy, it's all about what and where you buy. Lincoln Park is expensive, but even more than that, new construction with the latest finishes and the fancy oven and an upgraded roof deck is rarer, so has a big premium. (I have zero interest in a place like that, so makes it easier for me.) You could also get a 3/2 (as opposed to a 2/2) in Lincoln Park for significantly less than he spent.
  14. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    He said he'd lived there 18 years, so I assumed 39 at minimum.
  15. msmarjoribanks

    House Hunters: Buying in the USA

    I thought it had potential. I had assumed based on how they presented it that the second was by far a more convenient neighborhood, but no, not necessarily, this one was reasonably close to downtown, as well as some nature areas. I think some of the prior remodel was questionable, but if they are willing to address it over time it's not hard to fix.
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