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Roseanna

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  1. Roseanna

    Mad Men

    There were reliable books about aristocratic families in every country, unlike Google that includes much inaccurate information.
  2. Roseanna

    Mad Men

    I agree that it was more about Don's fear that if it was found out that he had a false identity, he would lose all he had got. But it didn't happen that way: when Pete found out, Bert said it didn't matter, Don was still a past master in his profession. On the other hand, in his private life Don paid a heavy price. Don had compartalized his life: work and mistresses in city, a model family in suburb. The latter was a house built on sand as shown by Betty's "problems" that were partly caused by Don's problems and was almost destroyed when Betty found out his cheating. She only let him return home because of pregnancy but it was only a cease-fire. Then she found out his false identity. If it had been the only lie, maybe it wouldn't have been fatal, but she knew that he had kept distance all the time and she had never known him. And as she didn't love him any more and a had new man willing to marry her, she got a means to get a divorce. Actually, the crux point of the show wasn't "when shall Don be found out and what will happen then" but how Don tried to cope with his childhood thraumas, his false identity and finally the guilt about mistreating people.
  3. Roseanna

    Mad Men

    As the US executed only one man for desertation during WW2, it would very much doubt that Don had any danger to have been shot. And it would have been weird even imprison him after years the war had ended.
  4. Roseanna

    S03.E06: A Coburg Quartet

    People rarely smiled in early pictures because they had to be unmoving. But smiling wasn't habit in the paintings, either. Either people just didn't value smiling - or they had bad teeth. Maybe he was just tired? At that time, couples weren't supposed to be madly in love after ten years of marriage and seven children. When Albert said that he would protect his wife and children, he fulfilled the husband's chief role, i.e. showed his love in deeds which matters more than words. There is one sure way to have a bad life: by thinking what might have been instead of concentrating to make one's life better or at least one's children's life better. Well said!
  5. Roseanna

    Mad Men

    Continueing: To me, Don's desertation wasn't a big deal - he didn't leave his comrades in stick nor kill POVs as those veterans he met. As far as I understand, the death of real Don Draper was an accident. Stealing his identity didn't actually hurt anybody. Although he was for these deeds guilty before law, morally he was guilty for hurting for his kid brother, first by vanishing for years and then by refusing to let him to be a part of his life. That he also felt guilty was is shown that he saw Adam under narcosis when his teeth was taken away.
  6. Roseanna

    Mad Men

    Yes, but isn't just there something essentially American? All immigrants had to leave their old identity behind and create a new one. Some fled injustice and persecution but others had themselves done something they fled. Many changed their names in order to conceal their origins and to be accepted. Some send money to their wives and children so that they could travel to them, but others simply left their family (without divorce) and formed a new one. Also, just as Don created his new identity from clothes to his family with Betty, he created ads whose essential messege was that "pursuing happiness" was reached by buying things. It was no coincidence that his Kodak ad was based on happy pictures about his family - and that was in the same time when he himself behaved in a way that was going to destroy his family.
  7. Roseanna

    Mad Men

    No doubt, but Don had also exceptional talents, charm and persuasion which made possible for him to succeed. He had no such benefits inherited in birth or created by marriage than Roger and Pete had. He was a self-made man - and not a bit also a con man considering the way he got Roger to hire him or claim Roger had done so. Many qualities that were Don's weaknesses in his private life were his strength in his professional life. Michael Ginsburg had also talents and, while himself afraid of sex, he could create ads with sexual sub text. But he couldn't stand stress and uncertainty in ad business because own psychological weaknesses. As for Joan, maybe her beauty that she believed to be her asset was also a handicap. For a long time she seemed to be content to be a secretary and have fun while her long-time goal in life was to marry well. She couldn't at all undestand that Peggy really wanted a career. Instead Peggy, a nice-looking youg woman but no beauty, was spared from marriage proposals and could concentrate on her career while of course needing men to help her (Freddy, Don, Ted). Instead, Joan first found no such man (TV ads), then was pimped by Pete and Lane, was sidelined by Ted and had to do a dirty trick to Pete. Happily, Joan finally found her strength other than sex whereas pretty girls Jane and Megan who married wealthy men didn't although getting money.
  8. Roseanna

    Mad Men

    To me, just their easiness together showed that they wouldn't become a couple despite being the most sexually charismatic people in the show. When Don and Betty slept together in the camp, Don said that he couldn't understand why sex was connected with intimacy to many people. They were most intimate then, but othewise, as have been said here, his most intimate relationships were with women he never had sexual relationship. Joan had a long affair with Roger who was married but that was "easy". But Joan never wanted to harm Mona who evidently silently accepted her husband's philandeering whereas Betty didn't know of it. As a husband of Betty, in his affairs outside the office, Don clearly wanted to prove different kind of women with whom he could be "somebody else" than in the office and at home - he couldn't do that with Joan who knew him. Don was keen to court trouble during his marriages: Sally's teacher Suzanne, the client's wife Bobbie and the neigbor's wife Sylvia. Don's affairs in the office happened when he was divorced from Betty. The one-night-stand with his secretary Allison showed sheer drunked stupidness as that kind of woman never could just forget. Promoting Megan after she became his wife wasn't a brilliant idea, either.
  9. Roseanna

    Mad Men

    Roger gave Joan expensive gifts but, although he did invite Joan back to work, he didn't exactly help her to get a head in business. She was a secretary until she was pimped by Pete and persuaded to accept by Lane. She said finally yes (and could have said no) but in the last analysis it was more men who used her sexuality in business. But luckily she was never actually forced. Cf. Pete who "helped" that poor German au pair and then insisted that she must pay for sex. BTV, I remember that Joan once said to the future "Buddha-man" (I can't now remember his name) that he was a babbler. Evidently they had had sex but he had talked about it to others and she never forgave him that. Also Peggy hinted to Joan that she had a "reputation" (a woman who searches for a husband and to have fun - but not in that order). Yet Peggy wasn't later sure whether Joan and Roger had had an affair.
  10. Roseanna

    Mad Men

    Joan was presented as a woman who wanted to have lots of fun before she settled down and knew how to use her sexuality for her advantage (I mean gitfts Roger gave her, not that awful Jaguar guy that was suggested by Pete. But her fate also showed that women were in a different situation in having sex than men. As a single girl Joan had had two abortions (presumably before the pill in the 50ies) and when she was married, she got pregnant from Roger because they sudden life-affirming sex after being robbed (presumably she didn't use the pill then because she tried to get pregnant by her husband when he was on leave from the army). Her original decision was abortion but in the last minute she retreated and decided to use that old trick by presenting the child as her husband's. Which he accepted - but could still leave the child as easily as his wife. (Yeah, he met the baby only on one leave, but still - what a jerk. Compared to Greg, Don was a paragon of father.) All in all Joan shows that great liberator of women, the pill, liberated men even more. I think it was great that the show dealt the theme of unwanted pregnancy in so many ways. Peggy was single and chose adoption because she put her career first and didn't want to suffer of "one mistake" her whole life (and no doubt the child would have suffered, too, whether Peggy had said aloud that "you destroyed my life" or only thought so). A mother of two children, Betty, was married but separated from her husband and thought about abortion but took Don back. Megan got miscarriage before she had time to decide what to do - and before she even told to her husband. At that Don said that he "wanted the same as you", but later suggested to have a baby but Megan refused because her acting career.) Compared these unwanted pregnancies, it was sad that just Trudy who so much wanted a child, had so much difficulties to get one. And Pete wasn't actually supporting and refused to adopt. Finally they got a baby and on the basis of what was shown to us, Trudy genuinely liked to be at home (unlike Joan and Betty) raising her daughter even if it was tiring in the beginning. Oh, I almost forgot Stephanie who also got pregnat as singe and gave away the child she had no means and abilities to take care of.
  11. Roseanna

    Mad Men

    Vince is so right! If the audience doesn't see f.ex. that X is in love, it's no good for the writer to explain that it was his/her aim.
  12. Roseanna

    The Americans

    In order to be able to read or watch fiction one must make an agreement to believe its premises. In The Americans, the FBI can't always make excellent work for otherwise Jenningses had been caught in S1 and there would be no series. Of course one can't believe all, but there is a difference between obvious and/or grave things that you can't believe when you read or watch (and that destroy your enjoyment) and things that you don't believe afterwards when you have thought the series thoroughly. Besides, looking from the oppsite POV, one simply can't describe reality as it is. The audience would yeawn if all was told. Thefore, one must choose those things that are relevant to the plot and characters - but add some "red herrings".
  13. Roseanna

    Mad Men

    To me, it was quite clear. First, Don's immediate reaction to Anna's death. If you know that your relative or friend is going to die and they are going to tell it by phone, you answer the phone rightaway. Don's reaction just isn't normal. Although one of course understands its reason (Anna is the only one who knows him and loves him), it tells volumes of Don's habit to avoid to meet things that cause him pain - only, this time he finally can't. Second, Anna's death brings Stephanie's role important in final season. Don tries to "save" and "protect" him as he saved and protected Anna, but Stephanie refuses to be saved by anybody. BTV, why exactly was Anna the only person who always loved Don, saw him (only) as the best light and treated him with kindness? Wouldn't it have been more natural that, even if she had taken Don's money as compensation for keeping silent that Don had stealed her husband's identity, she would have been angry towards him because of her husband's death ("Even if it was an accident, why had my husband to die and not you") and refused to have nothing to do with him?
  14. Roseanna

    The Americans

    That would demanded that Paige would have be watched 7/24. KGB has hardly so much personnel in the US. Theories like that reminds me the unsolved murders of camping teenagers in Finland 1960. Some amateur sleuths were convinced that it was done by the CIA because on the other side of the lake some members of the Finnish-American Society were camping - these Finns were of course Americans who were of course CIA men whose real target were KGB agents...
  15. Roseanna

    Mad Men

    I don't think Pete's marriage was so good in the beginning although there were good times later. In S1 Trudy wanted a greater apartment than Pete could afford with his salary and then he got money from his daddy (S1, ep. 4) and then there was disagreement with that horrible wedding present and rifle and after won again by his wife he showed the gun (a phallic symbol if any!) to Peggy and told his hunting fantasy (ep. 7). No wonder Pete slept with her the second time (ep. 8).
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