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AD55

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  1. AD55

    Book 9: Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone

    I think this is new: http://www.dianagabaldon.com/books/outlander-series/book-nine-outlander-series/a-roof-of-our-own/ And an update with draft chapter titles for section 1: http://www.dianagabaldon.com/books/outlander-series/book-nine-outlander-series/bees-update-with-chapter-titles/
  2. So much this. And it's not just that he went back but that he had the fortitude to hasten the priest's death. Were I in that situation, that's what I would want to do, but I'm not sure I would be able to go through with it. And I can imagine that he was roundly rewarded by his captors. I'm of two minds about how Show Roger comes off. I can't unread the books, so I can't honestly say I wouldn't have the same reaction as many/most of the nonbook readers. I do think Roger is more realistically portrayed than the other characters, who rival Wile E. Coyote for bouncing back from adversity. I can't let myself think too much about the saga of Jamie, who survived two (2!) whippings in close succession that would have killed most people, if not on the spot than from the inevitable infection; came back from the physical and psychological abuse he suffered at the hands of Jack Randall; overcame hideous injuries at Culloden, including a lengthy ride to Lallybroch in a rickety cart (IIRC); spent years in a cave; endured I forget how many years in a prison under wretched conditions--I don't care how great the weekly meals with LJ were, he would have been riddled with lice and suffering from malnutrition from the rat cuisine. It beggers belief. I think he also had some sort of near-death experience on the ship to America. And he still looks great (pace to those who can't get past the wig)! Roger looks and acts like someone who has been beaten within an inch of his life and walked 700 miles at the end of a rope, all the while not being entirely sure that his beloved wasn't partially responsible. I do think he suffers as a realistically represented character dropped into a show peopled with preternatural survivors, not excluding Stephen Bonnet, the Forest Gump of the eighteenth century.
  3. AD55

    S04.E13: Man of Worth

    I don't think there's a right or wrong interpretation--it's left ambiguous. "Stubborn" struck me as an odd word to use in the moment, but that doesn't mean it is. I'm mainly curious whether other folks think the change potentially changes how Roger is perceived. In my original post, I said it took two months for Claire and Jamie to get to River Run after they rescued Roger. I realize that's not correct--I was thinking of how old Gizmo was when they arrived. The actual trip must have taken longer.
  4. AD55

    S04.E13: Man of Worth

    Someone posted a page from the scene when Roger returns to Bree in DG's twitter feed (I assume it's authentic, but I didn't do any research to see). The following line from the original script was cut: "I rode to the circle of stones, but as soon as I saw them, I knew I never could go." This is followed by "I love you. I always will," which obviously was retained. Missing is the line "I'm stubborn, but I'm no a fool." I think this is an interesting choice. I noticed in the no book thread that folks seem to think Roger accompanied Claire and Jamie for two months and then needed an additional two days to mull his decision, which makes Roger look like an indecisive asshole. The omitted line follows the book in showing he separated from them, probably right away, to visit the stones and would have been following about two days behind them. (Well, it doesn't quite follow the book, since Roger and his infected foot arrived at Fraser's Ridge several weeks after Jamie and Claire, IIRC.) When I first heard it, I found the "I'm stubborn, but I'm not a fool" line confusing. Stubborn about what? Since he's talking to Bree, you would assume it has to do with her, but that makes no sense. He wouldn't be hearkening back to their posthandfast fight, since he decided to return to her almost right away but then was forced to accompany SB. Bree doesn't know this, but she knows he was on his way to Fraser's Ridge when he was waylaid by Jamie and Ian. Stubborn is an odd word to use to characterize his need to be sure that he can commit to living in the C18th. I then reckoned he must be talking about Jamie, and his stubbornness was a reference to his not appreciating being ordered to make a decision posthaste by the man who beat the crap out of him. I wonder why and by whom that change was made. Does anyone know if it came up in the podcast? It's a small edit that has, l think, somewhat major implications for how Roger is perceived going forward by nonbook readers. He will forever now be known as the jerk who needed over two months to decide whether he loved his wife enough to commit to her and her son.
  5. AD55

    S04.E13: Man of Worth

    Onscreen chemistry is mysterious, and I've read that sometimes it's better if the actors aren't too close. Husbands and wives, for example, often don't have good onscreen chemistry. I'm not sure why, but I speculate it's because there's a comfort level that translates to the screen, when you want to see sparks flying. I believe Cait and Sam have good chemistry, and they certainly seem close and comfortable together in interviews, so again, it's mysterious why some pairings work and others don't (not exactly a profound insight). Maybe the chemistry between Richard and Sophie will get better. Most of the scenes between Roger and Brianna thus far have emphasized that their love is mainly one-sided. I guess the exception is when they're handfast. I thought Sophie looked radiant in the reunion scene. Perhaps that will translate to next season, though if I recollect correctly, that won't be true to the books. I've always thought Roger was more invested in their relationship than Brianna. Roger traveled through the stones, so he chose her, but once they're both in the eighteenth century, Brianna doesn't exactly have her pick of suitors. Whom else is she going to marry? Jamie Frasers are thin on the ground.
  6. AD55

    S04.E13: Man of Worth

    In this interview with Richard Rankin, he makes a similar point:
  7. AD55

    S04.E13: Man of Worth

    I also love Richard Rankin and care about Roger and Brianna, though I do wish they'd cast someone else as Brianna.
  8. AD55

    S04.E13: Man of Worth

    It's not "whitewashing" history to point out that by definition there can never be consensual sex between an enslaved person and his or her "master." Slave owners didn't have "the upper hand." They had the power to kill, rape, maim, and sell the people they "owned." Someone up thread said that DG justifies the relationship between Ulysses and Jocasta by including the detail that Jocasta signed manumission papers for Ulysses. A convenient contrivance used to avoid addressing the fact that Jocasta has all the power. The show, at least, provides information on just how difficult it was to free a slave in NC in the eighteenth century. I don't recall if DG includes that context.
  9. AD55

    S04.E13: Man of Worth

    Because his traveling through time and working his way across the ocean not knowing for sure he would find her were evidently not sufficient indications of his commitment and love. Except Roger was almost to Fraser's Ridge when he was attacked by Jamie and Ian, not that I buy for a moment that he would have been able to find his way back there, or even to the stones, on his own while half out of his head with an infection and probably starving (How did he find food, by the way? Did he survive on roots and berries? Did Jamie and Claire give him a musket and a crash course on how to use it? In the book that's Brianna's job.). Anyhoo, that scenario struck me as absurd when I read the book, but perhaps I am projecting. I'm capable of losing my way in a strange house.
  10. AD55

    S04.E13: Man of Worth

    Yeah, Brianna's indifference is a problem for me, too. The show, like the book and frankly most of television and movies, has not been good on issues of race. Am I correct in remembering that Book Jocasta has sex with Ulysses? Man, I hope they leave that out. If the show offers up a sexual relationship between a slave owner and a slave as consensual, I will be done with it.
  11. AD55

    S04.E13: Man of Worth

    What you say about the Roger and Jamie "fight" makes a lot of sense. I buy that Roger sincerely loves Bree, but Bree has always seemed at best lukewarm about him. At most, she likes being the nerdy Scottish guy's crush. She would never marry him if they had stayed in the C20th. I'm a long way from this book, but I think that's how I felt when I was reading it, too. Their passionate reunion didn't make sense, but I suspended my disbelief because I wanted it for Roger and hell, for me, too. It's been a traumatic last few episodes. Unrelated, but am I alone in not enjoying the Murtagh/Jocasta love affair? I can't get past that she's a slave owner. I don't care about her, and I want her out of Murtagh's story.
  12. AD55

    S04.E13: Man of Worth

    I knew that moment was going to be called out as cheesy and unearned, and there's justification for that, but I think what you say makes a lot of sense, too. Whatever, I needed to see those two have a moment of joy after all they've been through, and Richard really needed a hug. He hasn't seen anyone who cares about him even remotely for months, with the possible exception of Claire. And this is one of the few scenes in which I think Sophie sold it. Her feelings for Roger have always seemed lukewarm to me. It's also a scene in which she had almost no dialogue, further support for the "she can't act and do an accent at the same time" theory. I found Roger's beating Jamie while Jamie just took it to be jarring and out of character for both of them. Even if you rationalize that Jamie believes he owes it to Roger to let him have a bit of his own back, I don't buy he's thinking that logically after having just lost Ian. I could see Roger hauling off and slugging Jamie once but I can't envision his character delivering a sustained pummeling to someone who isn't fighting back. Where's the satisfaction in that? I did love Catriona's disgusted expression, though. You could almost see her thinking, "listen asswit, I've been on Team Roger for the past few episodes, but your beating up my husband when he isn't resisting is making me wish I'd sat this one out."
  13. AD55

    S04.E12: Providence

    I liked the priest-in-the-Idiot-Hut plot more in the show than in the book, in large part because of the acting, though I had to decide to let the stupidity of the baptism plot contrivance go. Because the last episode is called "Man of Worth," I don't think it will end on a cliffhanger. The episode will likely capitalize on that theme in multiple ways for Jamie, Roger, Ian, and perhaps Lord John, which IMO will mean we get Roger's dramatic return and declaration. I strongly suspect the episode will end with that scene. I'm going to miss this season.
  14. AD55

    S04.E12: Providence

    I don't have an issue with his inflexibility, which I think is true to a more rigid era (and is I believe still doctrinally sound). But if only for the sake of the baby, a self-flagellating priest would have been unlikely to compound his sins by indulging in the sin of pride. I don't know how it was in the eighteenth century, but the priests who proselytized to the Mohawks in the seventeenth were Jesuits, who of all orders would have been familiar with the niceties of the sacraments. How do I know this? I regret to say my parents took my siblings and me on pilgrimages to Catholic shrines during summer vacations. And that's all I'll say about that. This is another one of those absurd episodes that I can't believe I'm even bothering to quibble about. What a mess this book is! Count me in as another one who loaths, loaths Brianna's visiting Bonnet.
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