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Colorful Mess

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  1. Colorful Mess

    Sansa Stark: A Direwolf In Sheep's Clothing?

    Yes and this was always the theory behind a Time for Wolves, that the Starks would rise, mostly by being patient, building good will, and waiting for everyone else to self-destruct.
  2. Colorful Mess

    Sansa Stark: A Direwolf In Sheep's Clothing?

    She's queen of her own realm. She won. Simple statements about Sansa winning anything must both you.
  3. Colorful Mess

    Sansa Stark: A Direwolf In Sheep's Clothing?

    She misjudged how deeply Tyrion was into the cult. She expected Tyrion to do the right thing when it mattered and work with Varys to help put Jon on the throne. I'm sure he wishes he would have listened to Sansa when she said Jon is "someone better." I think her instincts for ruling are just fine. She won the game of thrones.
  4. Colorful Mess

    Sansa Stark: A Direwolf In Sheep's Clothing?

    By that point when the dealing were being made, Sansa was expecting to get Jon back. That was the whole reason she was there. She sets up the North as independent, then she says regretfully, that the North lost their king. The subtext is that she was clearing the way for Jon to return back to the North to rule. She appeared to like that arrangement.
  5. The weight should be on how he enabled the killing of half a million people by believing in a tyrant. At least Tyrion felt guilty for that. The guilt of killing one person - who was clearly not innocent - isn't really that compelling. He should feel guilty for backing Dany for so long that he had to be a kinslayer. I'm glad he betrayed her and chose his family over her. He saved the world from ice and fire. Sam will be sure that gets written into A Song of Ice and Fire.
  6. Three times she's rounded up people and executed them as a group of prisoners, regardless of guilt/innocence. They did not personally betray her. That's enough character development for me for this decision. In her mind she probably took the whole city prisoner and executed them. Even though I think the show did enough legwork to get her there, there are book scenes that they excluded that could provide insight. They really needed to stick with book canon in the first dragon flight scene in S5. That was important character development for this S8 decision. In both, Dany had effectively won but she still wasn't satisfied. In both, she massacred innocents on her dragon. The only difference is that in the first one, she's not completely in control of Drogon yet. Still, she saw innocents massacred and was untroubled.
  7. Colorful Mess

    S08.E06: The Iron Throne

    Jon was not entirely innocent of the history of the realm; his own maester had seen to that. “That was the year of the Great Council,” he said. “The lords passed over Prince Aerion’s infant son and Prince Daeron’s daughter and gave the crown to Aegon.” “Yes and no. First they offered it, quietly, to Aemon. And quietly he refused. The gods meant for him to serve, not to rule, he told them. He had sworn a vow and would not break it, though the High Septon himself offered to absolve him. Well, no sane man wanted any blood of Aerion’s on the throne, and Daeron’s girl was a lackwit besides being female, so they had no choice but to turn to Aemon’s younger brother—Aegon, the Fifth of His Name. Aegon the Unlikely, they called him, born the fourth son of a fourth son. Aemon knew, and rightly, that if he remained at court those who disliked his brother’s rule would seek to use him, so he came to the Wall. And here he has remained, while his brother and his brother’s son and his son each reigned and died in turn, until Jaime Lannister put an end to the reign of dragonkings"
  8. Colorful Mess

    S08.E06: The Iron Throne

    “When you find yourself in bed with an ugly woman, the best thing to do is close your eyes and get on with it,” he declared. “Waiting won’t make the maid any prettier. Kiss her and be done with it.” “Kiss her?” Ser Barristan repeated, aghast. “A steel kiss,” said Littlefinger. Robert turned to face his Hand. “Well, there it is, Ned. You and Selmy stand alone on this matter. The only question that remains is, who can we find to kill her?” ... “He pushed back his chair and stood. “Do it yourself, Robert. The man who passes the sentence should swing the sword. Look her in the eyes before you kill her. See her tears, hear her last words. You owe her that much at least.”
  9. Colorful Mess

    S08.E06: The Iron Throne

    Ygritte kills one dude and Jon leaves her ass. Melisandre burns one girl and Jon banishes her. Stannis executes one man by fire and Jon disobeys. Jon commits treason against Stannis by switching babies. Daenerys kills THOUSANDS AND THOUSANDS of people and Jon's like "but I luvre her" and even then he still agonizes over whether it was the right thing to do. Dany burns an entire city and he's like... IDK TYRION. SHE'S MY QUEEN. She said she was going to take over more cities and Jon just stares like, a dumb cult member. I can understand Jon going into self-imposed exile due to the guilt. But Jon expresses no guilt for his role in enabling Dany's war crimes. Only Tyrion acknowledged that Dany did wrong, out of his own volition. Jon was more concerned about killing a murderous tyrant than the thousands killed in front of him. Why can Tyrion stick around? Tyrion told Jon to kill her - Greyworm doesn't care about that? And why is anyone listening to Greyworm anyway?
  10. Why does Dany fall right into Cersei's traps then? Cersei used Dany's invasion to sway lords to her side, and Dany looked exactly like the mad conqueror Cersei said she was. Cersei wanted Dany to kill civilians and Dany did exactly what Cersei wanted. If Cersei was as dumb as a rock she wouldn't have held the throne for as long as she did, and wouldn't have made Dany completely lose her marbles. While Dany was busy incinerating the populace like a bug exterminator, Cersei and Jaime were having an emotional, human moment. Its amazing they managed to make Cersei look sympathetic and make Dany look like a cold blooded killer.
  11. I still think its viewers' job to put in some work, to be critical of the "text." Viewers should examine why they were screaming "burn them all!" at the TV after Missandei's execution, examine why they started to see all the Starks as enemies, examine why Northern Independence was ridiculed when Sansa was wanted it but cheered when Robb and Jon were crowned, examine why they feel the need to blame Jon for Dany's actions because he didn't fuck her, examine why they justified every violent act because she's a homeless female orphan/rape victim. Some of this reflects my own journey reading the books: at the end, Dany still had contempt of the nobility in Meereen even though she had won, and she concluded that the nuclear option was the "solution." I found myself agreeing with her - BUT I was scared that I was agreeing with her. So I started to be more critical of her from that point.
  12. Rhaegar lost honorably and died - and he wasnt a conqueror. In the Astapor scene, Dany played dirty like Aegon the Conqueror and won. I think they were trying to show her character development as a conqueror, turning people into abstract things to subdue: "We’ve never really gotten a sense of her capacity for cruelty. She’s surrounded by people who are terrible people but who haven’t done anything to her personally. And it’s interesting to me that as the sphere of her empathy widens, the sphere of her cruelty widens as well. All at once she becomes a major force to be reckoned with. She spent a lot of time futilely kind of banging her fists on the doors and declaring that she was owed the Iron Throne by right, but now she’s stepped into her own as a conqueror.” - D.B. Weiss, S03E04 Inside the Episode Not that this matters that much. D&D lie through their teeth. They lie on screen using cinematic tricks, they lie to actors, they lie in magazines. Better to go with GRRM's interviews.
  13. Exactly, they are 1) illiterate, and 2) brainwashed. She can't afford them so she pulls a trick to get them anyway. She doesn't pay them a wage. Some of this is sketchy. I think its fine to have them fight other slavers in Essos, but once Dany used them for her own personal vengeance quest in a strange land they've never been to, that's morally grey. Re: directorial choices. Throughout, they are trying to play both sides of the "coin." D&D talk about her capacity for cruelty/empathy in that Astapor scene. Both are growing at the same time she's learning what conquering means. Its not a clear cut hero - and why would it be? Thats not the essence of the story. Jorah and Barristan as a litmus test for the audience isnt unquestionable approval of Dany. They arent exactly the sharpest tools in the shed. Jorah sold slaves just to be with a woman who hated him and Barristan was loyal to Aerys beyond reason. Sansa and Arya are about the only ones who get Dany right. "We don't trust your queen." Daario and Cersei also saw her for what she was and cut through a lot of the b.s.
  14. Thats what she did, though. Conquering involves killing everyone, with the goal of rule by fear. She learned how to do that in Essos. That was her "ruling arc" - how to conquer people then rule like a god above them. She just dropped the "I'm saving you while conquering you" farce, which is what all colonialists think they're doing. Dany became true to herself, her house words, and what dragons always represent in the story.
  15. Colorful Mess

    Sansa Stark: A Direwolf In Sheep's Clothing?

    I'm really glad Sansa stood against Dany as queen. Maybe she has a special tyrant radar after hanging around so many of them.
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