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Cupid Stunt

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  1. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    Field of Light Installation in Paso Robles Phony Guacamole: Skyrocketing Avocado Prices Have Caused a Frightening New Trend -- Don't they know enough to drain the squash before mixing? Live Nation admits to helping artists scalp their own tickets to make more money -- The country’s largest music promoter put 88,000 Metallica tickets on resale sites like StubHub, without giving fans a chance to buy them at face value. This kickback scheme is written into the ticket sales contract, and goes on with the full knowledge of the artists. And you thought street scalpers were bad? Hitler Looted the Art, Then They Looted Hitler Love Thy Neighbor: The Bible Belt Is Becoming a Dumping Ground Laboratories of democracy: what Seattle learned from having the highest minimum wage in the nation Fast-growing web of doorbell cams raises privacy fears Cops in One Village Have Been Convicted of 70 Crimes. Here’s What They Had to Say About It The biggest civil trial in U.S. history will start with these Ohio counties What the Equifax data breach settlement means for you Federal Election Agency, Hungry for Funds, Now Pays for Officials to Get to Office -- Congressional overseers raise concerns as the Election Assistance Commission picks up the tab for commissioners commuting to work from out of state. A Goodwill CEO resigns after threatening to stop paying disabled workers, sparking outrage Who should get the HPV vaccine? The recommendations keep changing. -- The HPV vaccine is now recommended for some people as old as 45. The Amazon dilemma: how a tech powerhouse that fulfills our every consumer need still lets us down -- Despite increasing criticism, Amazon refuses to acknowledge many of the unintended consequences its rise to dominance has spawned. Meet the woman whose name is on 2 million pints of ice cream -- Hi Jeni! Arkansas is the latest state to ban calling veggie burgers “veggie burgers” -- A new law bans those phrases, and others, on packaging in Arkansas. Tofurky and the ACLU are suing. New Hampshire sets tough drinking water standards for PFAS Breakups really suck, even if you’re a fish -- A study finds that when some fish lose their chosen mates, they become more pessimistic. How can an octopus help us stay warm? This everyday chemical was cast aside. Its replacement might be making cats sick How Dutch stormwater management could mitigate damage from hurricanes -- The world's only water ambassador, appointed by the Netherlands, says damage from hurricanes could be lessened with the help of Dutch-innovated stormwater management Jeffrey Epstein gave millions to Harvard and others; is that cash tainted? -- Perhaps he was merely attempting to influence university enrolment for his under-age victims. No? R. Kelly crisis manager resigns after controversial comments -- … in the interview, Gayle King asked Johnson whether he'd leave his own 20-something-year-old daughter with Kelly, with Johnson surprising the host by answering no. "Absolutely not," he said. "I wouldn’t leave my daughter with anybody that’s accused of pedophilia. Period." Well then … Warren Zevon, singer/songwriter
  2. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    Art Neville of Neville Brothers, the Meters Dead at 81 New Orleans stalwart pianist, singer left an indelible impression on funk, soul and jazz music during his 60-plus year career. Art Neville, a giant of New Orleans music who helped co-found the Neville Brothers and the funk outfit the Meters, has died, Nola.com reports. He was 81. Neville’s longtime manager, Kent Sorrell, confirmed the musician’s death, saying, “It was peaceful. He passed away at home with his adoring wife Lorraine by his side. He toured the world how many times, but he always came home to Valence Street.” A pianist and singer, Neville’s career spanned more than 60 years and left an indelible impression on funk, soul and jazz music. He helped set the bar for New Orleans funk with the Meters, who released eight albums between 1969 and 1977 and served as the backing band for artists like Dr. John, Robert Palmer and Allen Toussaint. He then joined forces with his brothers Charles, Aaron and Cyril to form the Neville Brothers, a highly influential and respected soul outfit. Perhaps no song better summed up Neville’s influence than “Mardi Gras Mambo,” a track he recorded with the Hawketts when he was just 16-years-old. The song remains a staple of New Orleans’ famous Fat Tuesday celebrations, ringing out across the city every February and March. Neville was born December 17th, 1937 and, as he and his brothers recalled in a 1987 profile in Rolling Stone, they grew up in a house with no record player, but one that frequently welcomed friends and neighbors, who came over with food and a guitar or a harmonica. Neville was a student of doo-wop groups like the Drifters and the Orioles, while he also idolized New Orleans piano legends like Fats Domino and Professor Longhair (with whom he’d later record). Following his first taste of success with the Hawketts, Neville joined the Navy for a six-year stint, that included two years on active duty. When he returned to New Orleans in the early Sixties, he recorded several songs as a solo artist, though it was his brother Aaron who became the first in the Neville family to break out on the national stage with his 1966 smash “Tell It Like It Is.” Art Neville, meanwhile, gigged relentlessly around New Orleans with his own group, Art Neville and the Neville Sounds, whom Toussaint eventually tapped as the Sansu Records house band. In 1968, the Neville Sounds renamed themselves the Meters and the following year they released their self-titled debut, which would feature one of the band’s signature songs, “Cissy Strut.” The Meters worked tirelessly over the next eight years, hitting a career peak with their 1974 album, Rejuvenation, which featured another classic track, “Hey Pocky Way,” and appeared at number 138 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time List. The Meters would also back Paul McCartney, open for the Rolling Stones and play on hits like Dr. John’s “Right Place, Wrong Time” and Labelle’s “Lady Marmalade,” but group never notched a proper hit of their own. As the Meters began to splinter in the late Seventies, Neville began performing again with his family (a contractual issue had actually prevented them recording together until about 1975). In 1976, the Nevilles worked on The Wild Tchoupitoulas, the self-titled album by a group of Mardi Gras Indians fronted by the Nevilles’ uncle, George “Big Chief Jolly” Landry. The experience inspired Art and his siblings to form their own group, which released their eponymous debut in 1978. Like the Meters, the Neville Brothers were critical darlings, hometown heroes (they regularly closed out the main stage at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival) and consummate musician’s musicians, but they too were dogged by a lack of commercial success. “Everybody in the industry digs us,” Neville told Rolling Stone in 1987. “Every other band, bands I love, bands I look up to, they looking at us the same way. Huey Lewis — those cats was onstage watching us every night. The Stones was watching us.” But, he added, “I wanna go to the bank. For once in my life, I’d like to be able to do something for my family.” While the Neville Brothers never did score that elusive hit, their late Eighties output marked an artistic peak: 1987’s Uptown featured guest appearances from Keith Richards, Jerry Garcia and Carlos Santana, while their acclaimed 1989 album, Yellow Moon, earned the group their first Grammy, Best Pop Instrumental Performance for “Healing Chant.” Following Yellow Moon, the Neville Brothers would release five more albums, winning one more Grammy, Best Traditional R&B Vocal Performance for their 1999 album Valence Street (Art also earned a Best Rock Instrumental Performance trophy for his contributions to a version of “SRV Shuffle” on 1996’s A Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan). The Neville Brothers’ last LP, Walkin’ in the Shadow of Life, was released in 2004. Neville would continue to tour and perform in the ensuing years, even as his health began to deteriorate. He regularly reunited with the Meters during the Nineties and into the 2000s, while he would also take the stage several more times with the Neville Brothers. He even occasionally performed with the next generation of Neville musicians, getting on stage with his nephew, Ivan Neville, of the New Orleans funk and jam outfit, Dumpstaphunk. In a 2013 interview with The Times-Picayune, Neville described his life-long devotion to music, saying, “You can bring me there in the ambulance, roll me onto the stage, give me a microphone, and a mirror where I can see the people… Man, look. I’ve been doing this all my life. I enjoy it. Even the bad parts of it, the parts I didn’t like… I found out that’s the way things go sometimes. You’ve got to go along with them.” -- Jon Blistein Into the arms of Abraham ...
  3. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    This has been a on-going issue for many years, and the final decision to paint over the Victor Arnautoff Depression-era murals has created a greater hubbub in the local arts community and it's spreading nationally. It's unfortunate that the school can't use the mural's bias as a teaching opportunity, and have an artist alter some of the most offensive imagery to reflect a more modern read of history, though several of the murals are historically accurate. I don't know. My suggestions are just as lame as painting over the murals. This nation has difficulty looking directly at history, or acknowledging the strain of racism that poisons everything from our beginnings. Racism cannot be painted over and called done. What the San Francisco Board of Education is attempting to do will never be enough until a brutal national conversation is had … And that conversation seems to be rearing up its head in a very ugly manner.
  4. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    Chandrayaan-2: Success in India's second attempt at launching Moon mission An Irishman wins the British Open -- At Royal Portrush Golf Club in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Shane Lowry will never have to buy another pint in Ireland the rest of his life. Well done. Meritocracy in Action -- Did this student deserve admission to UCLA's renowned gymnastics team? Ex-NSA Contractor Who Stole Top Secret Documents Is Sentenced To 9 Years In Prison Equifax exposed 150 million Americans' personal data. Now it will pay up to $700 million -- It took Equifax 76 days to discover and report the data breach. Who Is Belle Delphine, the Gamer Girl Selling Her Bathwater? -- She's never going to have sex with you, Pimples. Deepfake videos pose a threat, but ‘dumbfakes’ may be worse Sex Traffickers, Ahoy! -- Police break up huge ‘modern day slavery’ ring in UK AP-NORC Poll: Americans rarely seek guidance from clergy -- The results of when you do not denounce corruption and call evil by its name. A math equation that predicts the end of humanity -- 760 years, give or take … Plenty of time to rearrange the deck chairs on the Titanic. San Francisco to paint over historic George Washington mural How India runs the world’s biggest election. What it takes to reach 900 million voters. Ethnic Extermination in Plain Sight -- Dutch Supreme Court upholds Srebrenica deaths liability Funeral service held for 86 Muslims killed by Serbs The Latest: Relatives of victims condemn Srebrenica ruling Kosovo PM resigns following Hague war crimes court summons Serbia’s president says Kosovo PM’s resignation is a ‘trick’ How about a little racist indignation, Scarecrow? It's just as incendiary and deliberate. ‘Go Back’ remark: In workplace, it might be illegal During the ‘most segregated hour,’ preachers grapple with America White man said ‘Go back where you came from’ Inside the calculated race to create the next drink of summer -- It’s shrewd, aspirational marketing — not just hot weather — that gave rise to rosé, Aperol spritzes and hard seltzer. Oh No! We Won't Glow! -- Nuclear industry push for reduced oversight gaining traction Phony Ferraris, ‘Shamborghinis’ seized at Brazil factory -- ‘Shamborghinis’ … <snerk> A Rastafarian church in Wisconsin reopens after being raided -- "We're Back Baby!" It's like you never left. Hey there! Elusive Emu Remains at Large in North Carolina After More Than Three Weeks Venezuelan migrants take arepas to new lands amid crisis -- Arepas are delicious! Send in the troops: Congo raises the stakes on illegal mining How a family's Smart home let a hacker inside -- AI talks to its Master Kanye West, singer/songwriter/sampler/fashion designer
  5. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    Thank Goddess Kali that she made babies puppy/kitten cute, because after that first full diaper or six weeks of colic, humanity would have died out eons ago. Congratulations, Auntie Jewel! You got it. I'm just a well-shod, Left Coast pot-stirrer. ; ) Hilarious … Though, I don't think fame and fortune on America's Home Videos is in the cards for you, Ohio. I'll take that challenge. I've had the best results with the King Arthur Flour recipe, and it's a mirror image of my mother's recipe. I use the non-diastatic malt powder as the sweet catalyst. Yes! I bounce between The Mekons and The Clash as my favorite punk bands. The documentary Revenge Of The Mekons is on Netflix. There is a YouTube version that has to be signed in for age declaration. This video is from the Q&A of Jon Langford after a showing of the documentary:
  6. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    The Rich, Complex History Hiding Within Chinese Plate Designs
  7. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    Who's a buddy? It's Steve! He looks in very good shape, Jewel. It must be a relief that he's settled in, and not panicking that you're leaving him.
  8. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    Central American Migrants Are 'Voting With Their Feet' Despite U.S. Threats -- … government recently announced more than $560 million in aid cuts to Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador—the Northern Triangle—in a bid to pressure them to slow the flow of migrants to the U.S. But the plan faces a grim economic reality: aid isn’t nearly as vital as the billions of dollars in remittances sent home by migrants in the U.S. Mooncakes, hymns and post-it notes: the color of Hong Kong's protests -- Hong Kong’s protests have drawn millions of people to the city’s streets in recent months and thrown the former British colony into its biggest political crisis since it was returned to China in 1997. The activism has also powered a wave of colorful cultural expressions of diverse origins, from protest mooncakes to Christian hymns, that have filled the city’s streets. Who's responsible for the proliferation of opioids and Meth? An onslaught of pills, hundreds of thousands of deaths: Who is accountable? Internal drug company emails show indifference to opioid epidemic Drug companies shipped suspicious opioid orders -- Companies that make and distribute opioids didn’t abide by a requirement that they refuse to ship orders of the powerful prescription painkillers when they deemed them suspicious, helping fuel a national addiction and overdose crisis, two Ohio counties said in a legal filing July 19. Drug company, 4 people indicted in US painkiller probe Florida ‘pill mills’ were ‘gas on the fire’ of opioid crisis Asia's meth trade is worth an estimated $61B as region becomes 'playground' for drug gangs Climbing the social ladder, one under-age girl at a time: Heiress Ghislaine Maxwell paved the way for Jeffrey Epstein Private investigator has spent a decade on Jeffrey Epstein's trail For ‘client’ Jeffrey Epstein, an unlocked cell in a Florida jail Florida sheriff to investigate Epstein’s work release Internet Hacking Test -- An entire nation just got hacked Their ancestors were slain a century ago along the US-Mexico border. They say now is the time to retell the horror Pennsylvania school district tells parents to pay their lunch debt, or their kids will go into foster care What economists have gotten wrong for decades -- Four economic ideas disproven by reality. Governors in these states can give workers a raise with the stroke of a pen -- “Wage board” laws in Colorado, California, and New Jersey let an entire sector’s wages go up at once. The Ice Bucket Challenge and the promise — and the pitfalls — of viral charity -- Five years later, the ALS Association tells us how they spent the money. What consumers can do as regulators weigh compounds’ risks Space Stuff: What would alien life mean for Catholicism? The Vatican’s chief astronomer explains Hawaii telescope protesters don’t back down after arrests Giant Hawaii telescope to focus on big unknowns of universe Native Hawaiians say telescope represents bigger struggle Wait 'till I get you home -- A missing toddler drove himself down to the county fair on his toy tractor An ice cream recall -- NOW? Canadian dairy issues warning amid heat wave Millennials abandoned cereal: General Mills is betting that kids and older people will bring it back -- Really? Thing2 is the Seinfeld of our family. Good things happen to bad people -- Three white supremacists were sentenced to prison for violence at Charlottesville rally Influencers on the Interwebs -- Everyone is focused on how to generate income: This couple has 7 Instagram-famous pets Instagram Is Experimenting With Hiding Likes, Which Would Make It Much Harder to Be an Influencer Instagram Is Testing Hiding Likes and Views In Seven Different Countries Instagram is thinking about hiding the public “Like” count Social influencers see stardom potential on LinkedIn and Pinterest Country rap is getting bigger, and Lil Nas X is leading the way Stevie Wonder’s irresistible ode to jazz, explained Stevie Wonder, singer/songwriter
  9. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    One giant leap for mankind: 50 years on -- The United States is preparing to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the day when astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first human to set foot on the surface of the moon. The historic event on July 20, 1969 was witnessed live by television audiences around the world and catapulted the U.S. to the forefront of space exploration. Summer of Space; A Woman's Place is in Space: Meet Eight Asian American Women Reaching for the Stars The Space Issue, an excellent longform read from Texas Monthly Internal drug company emails show indifference to opioid epidemic Federal data shows opioid shipments ballooned as crisis grew -- Feed the need. Border protection stored enough fentanyl to kill 794 million, but isn’t doing enough to protect its agents A whole generation of migrant kids is languishing at the U.S.-Mexico border The Economist Who Would Fix the American Dream -- No one has done more to dispel the myth of social mobility than Raj Chetty. But he has a plan to make equality of opportunity a reality. A retired teacher found some seahorses off Long Beach. Then he built a secret world for them What fuckery is this? Men’s Stock Rises When They Trade in Young Women Jeffrey Epstein was hardly alone in treating them like consumable pleasures. How a Predator Operated in Plain Sight University of Michigan student Kathy Zhu stripped of Miss Michigan World America title -- I can see why she didn't qualify for Miss Congeniality El Chapo’s Prosecution Has Fueled the Drug War in Mexico -- Nature abhors a vacuum. Democrats slam USDA's relocation of economists as blow to scientific research Federal Insider: These USDA employees face a stark choice: Move to Kansas City or be fired 85 jobs would come to Colorado under proposed BLM headquarters move, which still needs approval -- House committee chair says Interior didn't notify until July 16 Here’s What We Know About The BLM’s Move To Grand Junction Busy busy busy ... Famous Daffodil Hill in California Is Closing Indefinitely Due to Overtourism -- Droves of flower-obsessed Instagrammers forced this beautiful field to close. Scientists find new way to kill disease-carrying mosquitoes New clues on why women’s Alzheimer’s risk differs The heat goes on: June toastiest on record, July may follow California pot regulators struggling with job, audit says -- How hard can it be when you're pulling millions in fees/taxes and state drug enforcement is still in place? Your only job is to regulate, so stop using the product and do your fucking job. California pot seller asks court to void county delivery ban -- Umm … No. Intl court convicts Congo rebel leader known as ‘Terminator’ -- Good. Santigold, singer/songwriter
  10. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    Johnny Clegg, anti-apartheid musician in South Africa, dies Johnny Clegg, a South African musician who performed in defiance of racial barriers imposed under the country’s apartheid system decades ago and celebrated its new democracy under Nelson Mandela, died Tuesday. He was 66 and had pancreatic cancer. The Grammy-nominated and British-born singer sometimes called the “White Zulu” died peacefully at home in Johannesburg with his family there, according to Clegg’s manager, Roddy Quin. “He fought it to the last second,” Quin told the South African Broadcasting Corporation. Clegg’s multi-racial bands during South Africa’s white minority rule attracted an international following. He crafted hits inspired by Zulu and township harmonies, as well as folk music and other influences. South Africa’s government said in a statement that “his music had the ability to unite people across the races .... Clegg has made an indelible mark in the music industry and the hearts of the people.” One of his best-known songs was “Asimbonanga,” which means “We’ve never seen him” in Zulu. It refers to South Africans during apartheid when images of the then-imprisoned Mandela were banned. Mandela was released in 1990 after 27 years in prison and became South Africa’s first black president in all-race elections four years later. Political opposition leader Mmusi Maimane said Clegg “wrote our SA story when our country was at its worst and at its best.” The Grammy-winning Soweto Gospel Choir said it was “devastated” by Clegg’s death and called him a “music icon and a true South African.” Fellow musicians posted similar tributes on social media. Clegg learned about Zulu music and dancing as a teenager when he hung out with a Zulu cleaner and street musician called Charlie Mzila. He later explored his idea of “crossover” music with the multi-racial bands Juluka and Savuka at a time of bitter conflict in South Africa over the country’s white minority rule. Clegg recorded songs he was arrested for and “never gave in to the pressure of the apartheid rules,” his manager said. The apartheid-era censorship also restricted where he could perform, yet Clegg “impacted millions of people around the world,” Quin said. “He played a major role in South Africa getting people to learn about other people’s cultures and bringing people together.” The musician performed as late as 2017, high-kicking and stomping during a tour called “The Final Journey” while his cancer was in remission. At a concert in Johannesburg that year, Clegg said that “all of these entries into traditional culture gave me a way of understanding myself, helping me to shape a kind of African identity for myself, and freed me up to examine another way of looking at the world.” In December, Clegg told South African news channel eNCA the “toughest part of my journey will be the next two years” and called himself an “outlier” in an interview that mused about mortality. The performer was diagnosed with cancer in 2015, and the grueling treatment included two six-month sessions of chemotherapy and an operation. “I don’t have a duodenum and half my stomach. I don’t have a bile duct. I don’t have a gall bladder and half my pancreas. It’s all been reconfigured,” he told reporters in 2017. In that interview, Clegg recalled how he performed “Asimbonanga” while on tour in Germany in 1997 and experienced a “huge shock” when Mandela, beaming and dancing, unexpectedly came out on stage behind him. “It is music and dancing that makes me at peace with the world. And at peace with myself,” Mandela said to the audience. He asked Clegg to resume his performance and urged the audience to get up and dance. At the end of the song, Mandela and Clegg, holding hands, walked off stage. “That was the pinnacle moment for me,” Clegg recalled. “It was just a complete and amazing gift from the universe.” -- CARA ANNA and CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA Johnny Clegg’s War on Apartheid A life very well lived.
  11. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    There's a discussion in Getting To Genoa You about NYC water being superior, thus the bagels are, too. My water district is on a Toilet to Tap water reuse system, and is processed to be "soft." Many food services in the district, that rely on water for their processing, test for mineral content and add to enhance the flavor of their products. I grew up with fresh bread baked daily by my mother for her family and the ranch crew; she makes an excellent bagel with artesian well water -- Go figure. Maybe it's the love. "But it's a dry cold" … <snerk> That's what the native Minnesotans told me at the Pond Hockey Tournament in a -4F wind chill on a frozen lake -- Must be a universal assessment wherever you go. I grew up with winter snow in Owens Valley, not enormous amounts, but once in a while we'd get hit with a blizzard. The best part about SoCal are the transplants from places that have a regular winter for several months out of the year. They move from Mason City/Chicago/Pittsburg/NYC, and the first cold snap in SoCal, out come the parkas, ski hats and moon boots from 1994, reeking of mothballs. They huddle in their apartments with inefficient, dusty electric heaters they've turned on for the first time, and wonder why their California Dream has turned so cold and damp. Do I miss snow and cold? I can hop in my car and find a snowbank in 90+ minutes. They're still skiing in board shorts and tank tops on Mammoth Mountain, and it might continue until August. That's the California Dream.
  12. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    Church sign in Virginia says "America: Love or Leave It." -- Best Regards from the Friendship Baptist Church of Appomattox, Virginia. I understand there's an appropriate courthouse available for the surrender of all traitors. Capitol Police arrest 70 in immigration protests, including 90-year-old nun Across US, clergy mobilize to support vulnerable migrants Convenience store clerk says customers 'need to go back to their country' in video confrontation Germany honors resisters who tried to assassinate Hitler Prosecutors bring rare criminal charges against Ohio opioid distributor Buried in opioids, sickened community eyes drug makers’ role Living in Cars Is Becoming Even More of a Thing in Los Angeles San Francisco proposes safe parking for homeless A raging wildfire is burning nearly 7,000 acres near Arizona's Prescott National Forest New York’s climate plan will drive big changes, if it works Canadian platform spills 3,200 gallons of oil-mix into Atlantic Environmental Protection Agency rejects proposed ban on chlorpyrifos, despite growing evidence of its toxicity Paint makers reach $305 million settlement in California, ending marathon lead poisoning lawsuit How lithium-rich Chile botched a plan to attract battery makers Times Investigation: Homeland Insecurity Theater has gutted programs aimed at detecting weapons of mass destruction George Will makes the conservative case against democracy -- Majority rule will be the death of the American experiment, and that the conservative project is at odds with democracy. Translation: Everything for me. None for thee. Google Protest Leader Leaves, Warns of Company's Unchecked Power Here’s where the US government is using facial recognition technology to surveil Americans -- A new map shows how widespread the use of facial recognition technology has become. About 10,000 au pairs to get paid in class-action settlement The Raise the Wage Act will tie future increases to changes in middle-class pay. Utah boy advertises ‘Ice Cold Beer’ at root beer stand -- Ingenuity, in spite of an overwhelming restrictive culture and liquor laws to the contrary. It's a start ... Epstein denied bail in sex abuse case Epstein defense offers explanation for foreign passport Scientists are grappling with our biggest limitation in spaceflight: our own bodies -- We’ve sent people to space for decades — but we’re only beginning to learn what that means for human health. Married trophy hunters who kissed over dead lion face social media hate Where lions once ruled, they are now quietly disappearing -- There are half as many African lions than there were 25 years ago. Conservation programs aim to protect the disappearing species by promoting human-lion cohabitation across the African savanna. Jon Langford and Tom Greenhalgh of the Mekons, singer/songwriters
  13. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    If it isn't raining, that's some serious tropical goop … Nasty. I'm a desert person, so 95% humidity is going to a steam bath to sweat it out and open the pores for extraction. Oof! Have mercy on dem' poor mooses! There's nothing worse than going from AC/heat/AC/heat/AC/hot car belching out AC/heat/ meat locker AC/heat radiating off sidewalk/AC … I carry a sweater or blazer from location to location because you never know how cold it's going to be indoors. Moving the Algonquin Piano Bar to Valley's house for the duration! Whoever is bring Peaches' dip, triple the recipe. I called the liquor store for the usual libations and extra ice. ; ) I thought all bagels were boiled, otherwise they weren't bagels. My neighborhood panadería (Mexican bakery) makes excellent bagels, but my favorite LA bagels are from Nate’n Al's Delicatessen; not too big, crusty, with a chewy interior and a light yeasty bite. So hungry .... The bagels I had for breakfast at the InterContinental Hotel were delicious. They had ricotta and honey, with pear slices ... Gotta' go to lunch now …
  14. Cupid Stunt

    Small Talk: Out of Genoa

    Meet Major Motoko Kusanagi. When you give click-bait answers to click-bait questions, the results are to be expected --Scarlett Johansson on Freedom of Film Casting: "I Should Be Able to Play Any Person, Tree, Animal" -- Because the whitewashed stuntcasting of (Motoko Kusanagi) your character in Ghost in a Shell didn't profoundly ruin an already badly conceived and produced movie. Trevor Noah on Scarlett Johansson's Representation Comments: "We Take for Granted How It Shapes Society" You downloaded FaceApp. Here’s what you’ve just done to your privacy. Breaching a “carbon threshold” could lead to mass extinction -- Carbon dioxide emissions may trigger a reflex in the carbon cycle, with devastating consequences, study finds. Berleley becomes the first city to ban natual gas in new home construction Waking up from the dark night of America's soul ... CBS News gets exclusive look inside America's largest migrant processing facility How to address the causes of the migration crisis, according to experts -- Migrants are fleeing Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador for the US. Here’s what filling the vacuum in U.S. foreign policy on Central America might look like. Jon Stewart rips blocking of 9/11 victims fund -- They show their loyalty to tax give-backs for the wealthy and corporations, but dissemble on a debt we owe 9/11 first responders The WHO finally declared a public health emergency over Ebola -- The outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has been ongoing since last August. Microsoft reports hundreds of election-related cyber probes Oklahoma AG calls consumer products giant Johnson & Johnson ‘kingpin’ in state’s opioid crisis New data shows drug overdose deaths fell in 2018. But there’s a big catch. -- It would be the first decline in drug overdose deaths in decades. But there are reasons to be cautious. Data show many companies contributed to US opioid crisis The Sacklers made billions off the opioid crisis. The Louvre is taking their name off its walls. -- Museums have been grappling with revelations that the prominent philanthropists made money off prescriptions they knew caused addiction. “Everybody can be a sucker”: Marc Maron and Lynn Shelton on how conspiracy theories flourish Hot chocolate: 17 tons of cocoa burns on German highway -- <weeps> Rejoice in all things, no matter how small or fleeting ... Australian finds message in a bottle written 50 years ago Georgia beachgoers help pilot whales from stranding on shore Animal rescue group needs help caring for 89 baby birds from damaged rookery Nesting penguins can’t resist lure of New Zealand sushi shop Sex toys will be officially sanctioned at CES after vibrator controversy -- We know how you are. Slick marketing, subscription models, and eco-consciousness are changing the TP landscape. -- Someone gives a crap. California officers reunite 250-pound tortoise with owners -- Said "Californy is the place I ought'a be." so he loaded up the shell and he moved to Beverly … Hills, that is. Swimmin pools, movie stars. Germany introducing mandatory measles vaccination for kids India’s trucks are works of art Moon News! Going back to the moon could cost $30 billion. It might be worth it. -- If we collect more moon rocks, we could unlock secrets about the Earth, the moon, and the solar system … And how to exploit its untouched mineral riches. Meet Margaret Hamilton, the badass '60s programmer who saved the moon landing -- Her code fixed a malfunction that could’ve prevented Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong from landing safely. 9 terrific movies about landing on the moon, from the sublime to the ridiculous Prince, singer/songwriter It's HOT out there! Please take care of yourselves, your children and pets. Check on your neighbors. And keep hydrated!
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